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Showing content with the highest reputation since 10/26/2019 in Posts

  1. 4 points
    Practically every episode of "I Love Lucy" was filmed in less than an hour, including camera reloads and costume changes. The record was only 42 minutes! (The "no-retakes" rule helped.) When they filmed "The Freezer", they shot it from start to finish, only applying those "frozen Lucy" makeup effects that could be applied very quickly just before she was rescued from the freezer. When they reached the end of the final scene, they announced to the audience that they were going to apply more "frozen" makeup to Lucy and re-shoot the "Freezer rescue" scene, but it would take at least an hour to apply all of Lucy's makeup, so the audience was free to go. But if anyone wanted to wait around and watch the reshoot, they could. As it turned out, every single member of the audience sat and waited for over an hour to watch the re-shoot of that scene.
  2. 3 points
    I stumbled across 1966's "Lucy Gets a Roommate" (Carol Burnett) on youtube. It is by far the best of Carol's 7 TLS/HL appearances. This was a year before Carol got her variety series and four years after she left The Garry Moore Show. In the meantime she had had a Broadway show and a special or two. But many CBS affiliates were unsure enough about Carol that they did not carry "TCBS" that fall (as I read in TV Guide), so I'm unclear just what Carol Burnett meant to the general public at that particular time. The episode is a fun and funny half-hour. I was struck by a couple things: -what a generous performer Lucille Ball was. The episode is designed as a showcase for Carol who is given the bulk of the comedy. Lucy carries her own but is essentially playing straight for Carol. 1966's Lucille Ball had nothing to prove, but not all performers would design a showcase for another who could potentially be considered a rival, and a 20-years younger one. -how far afield The Lucy Show got from the original premise in a very short period of time. Though undeniably funny, the "Roommate" proceedings are played much more broadly, sort of a sitcom-skit hybrid, a unique style that was not usually satisfying, IMO. I can't think of another similar sitcom, can you? It's impossible to imagine "Roommate" being done any time in the first 2 seasons. (I never equate the 3rd season Danfield episodes as being the same caliber as the first two). I didn't watch the Roommate sequel "Lucy and Carol in Palm Springs" but is there ANY reference to roommate Carol moving out of the Glenhall Apartments? As I recall, Carol Bradford's goofy, shy librarian character is totally different in "Palm Springs". The 1962-64 shows had at least SOME continuity but by this time TLS did not...and apparently no one cared. "Roommate" ranked #1 for its week!. Both the Carol Burnett TLS 2-parters offer a format-changing shift that is abandoned and never mentioned again after Bradford/Tilford returns to wherever she came from. The Tilford exit is even worse. They two DID graduate from stewardess school after all; and with enough honors to headline--some of their fellow graduates might say HOG---the graduation musical show (attended by ?????). Just try to imagine the 2-part stewardess shows as part of season 1 with Lucy and Viv playing the exact same script, Viv subbing for Carol! (...pausing while you do that....). To me the only highlight of both is the brief but hilarious visual of Lucy fighting the movie film upstream. Even when the comedy has potential, it's ruined by artificiality. The serving lesson has that fake-sounding over-dubbed tick of a clock. When Lucy and Carol's turn devolves into mayhem, it's accompanied by the annoying college fight song music---and doesn't the clock start ticking faster for no reason? Episodes like these are the type that have tarnished historic reputation of The Lucy Show. Entertaining (mostly) but vapid. .....sort of like my posts. When books are written about 60s TV shows, The Lucy Show, THE MOST successful sitcom of the decade (title shared with Andy Griffith), barely gets a mention, let alone any respect.
  3. 3 points
    Oh, I've thought about that - if the show was a hit, how long would she continue with it. I though maybe 3 seasons. If LWL was a hit that would have really kept Lucy in good spirits and maybe health and she probably would have lived longer. I think you are right, if the seasons had continued they would have eventually acknowledged the age issue. They never got a chance to work on improving the show.
  4. 2 points
    Wth those settings, Viv must really be a sight from behind in her knit suit!
  5. 2 points
    I swear I thought he died years ago. He was old in the 1980s on Our House.
  6. 2 points
    Lucy Barker has made the cover of Billy Van Zandt's upcoming memoir: https://www.amazon.com/GET-CAR-JANE-Adventures-Wasteland-ebook/dp/B0855TWKKB/ref=sr_1_2?dchild=1&keywords=Lucille+Ball&qid=1587682464&s=books&sr=1-2&swrs=14563003FA86252FE7DF3F10B1E91F5C
  7. 2 points
    I see they're going to do another All in the Family. There's no denying the greatness of "AitF" and Norman Lear's contribution. But to me, the lasting appeal is in the performance of Carroll O'Connor. Beyond Family, I'm not much of a Norman Lear's 70s "relevant comedies". They're too broadly played, very "presentational", WAY too LOUD with everybody YELLING; and not all that funny. Their social themes are hammered with the subtlety as that garlic sandwich. Plus they ushered in that era of videotape instead of film. Thankfully the MTM crowd stuck with film. Positive note on the Lear shows: I liked their theme songs. I have to give them chutzpah credit for attempting to recreate episodes from the original scripts. I saw the last one. I can't say they really succeeded, but it's always fun to see something LIVE. So "All in the Family": fine, but "Good Times"? Really?? Maybe I never saw a good episode. Personally I'd rather see a cast recreate "Lucy is NG as RN"!
  8. 2 points
    That would've made a very interesting episode indeed, although probably far too risqué for 1950s television. Hell, there'd be people TODAY who'd consider that to be in bad taste. My mother's rather puritanical in many respects, and she considers the idea of married women or men spending time alone with someone of the opposite sex to be the height of impropriety, no matter the circumstances. Nevertheless, Lucy and Fred heading off to Palm Springs leaving Ricky and Ethel in Hollywood would've been fascinating. Everything could start out fine, but soon Fred's jingling drives Lucy nuts, and then Ricky starts calling Ethel out for her chewing. Then their imaginations start running amuck, with everyone convinced that cheating is going on. Trouble is, they cross paths, and soon Ethel and Ricky are in Palm Springs with Lucy and Fred back in Hollywood. Could've been quite a farcical episode if done right. I know Ethel's in a bad mood for most of "Ricky Sells the Car," but she did show a bit of jealousy over Lucy rubbing Fred's shoulders. "Since when did you and him become so chummy!?" There were certainly enough episodes where Lucy thought Ricky was being unfaithful...Ethel suspecting fat Freddie of wandering could've made for a hilarious change of pace.
  9. 2 points
    Lucy Is A Sax Symbol When Lucy pulls the saxophone out of the trunk the audience clap is nice. They knew it was her trademark instrument. With the saxophone appearing in this episode, Lucy has now played one on each of her 4 series. Lucy and Becky have a very lovely scene at the end and I don’t think it’s too sappy. Jenny was a good young actress and I think if another less talented kid was to do this scene it would be too sweet. A meta reference I liked was Becky saying she rather play electric guitar. Jenny actually does play guitar now. Whoever wrote this episode has never played a saxophone. When Lucy has Becky push her lips together, that’s how you would play a brass instrument. For example to play a trumpet you need to purse your lips to create a buzz noise. To play the saxophone you roll your lower lip over your teeth and the mouthpiece sits on them. You also don’t puff your cheeks out to play. When Lucy says her ring is stuck in the valve, I can see that working as a stuck point, but where it would be stuck is not a valve. It’s the cutout for the key. If she slid her hand in the bell and the large part of the ring wrapped itself over the lip of the brass then it could feasible get stuck. I played the sax for 9 years in school and when Lucy starts pushing on the keys and you hear the pads touch the brass, that brought back so many memories of my years playing. I also noticed the transition music had a heavier sax element to it than other episodes. Three pop culture notes. That pink cassette player of Becky’s was really popular in the 80s. I can’t remember if I had one or a friend did but I remember using it. It also had a strap on so you could carry it with you. Lucy holding up the poodle skirt saying that will never come back in style. The 80s was very big on 50s nostalgia so thought that was odd. Also, those swing skirts are super popular in the vintage community now, although I don’t see any with poodles on. Cats, haunted houses, bikes, even found one with backgammon pieces. I forget who was watching the Three Stooges marathon but I wonder if they noticed a tall blonde lady that looked kind of like grandma.
  10. 1 point
    I believe I can now say "I've seen everythin', brudder!" I wonder if the audience knew they were listening to the golden vocals of one Lucille Ball.
  11. 1 point
    The I Love Lucy Christmas Special returns to CBS on Friday, December 20, at 8 p.m.! Awaiting word on which episode will be featured after the Christmas episode, but it is NOT a repeat of Pioneer Women, as mentioned by some CBS affiliates. Possibly "The Freezer", after the sneak peek we got in the Colorization Documentary?
  12. 1 point
    Wilford Brimley has died at 85; yes, only 85. It seems like he’s been an old geezer with di-a-beetus forever.
  13. 1 point
    The "We Love Lucy" episode of Will & Grace received three Emmy nominations today: Outstanding Directing for James Burrows, Outstanding Editing, and Outstanding Production Design.
  14. 1 point
    Have to concur about the tith on edge. I couldn’t believe it when I found out Rainbow was his actual surname. A gay man named Rainbow born in Queens...it’s so on the nose it’s not even funny.
  15. 1 point
    Poor Carl didn't get to outlast the administration he so artfully and frequently tweeted about. The pictures of Carl and Mel hanging out on Saturday are extra heartwarming knowing that it would be their last time together. It's almost unbelievable, considering how active and present he'd been right up until the end.
  16. 1 point
    Had a lovely lunch the other day watching this panel. Rue had a great memory for the episodes. Loved the interplay between Betty and Rue and good audience questions.
  17. 1 point
    Very well put and you are so right. Were it not for this episode I don't know if I would know what a Cobb salad is. If I ever see "Veal Cutlet Marco Polo" on any menu, I will order it. Isn't that what Fred ordered? Lucy had the spaghetti of course. I don't remember what Ethel ordered.
  18. 1 point
    Thanks for this. I didn't realize that Lucie Arnaz only appeared in HALF of the 6th season episodes. I appreciate these are listed in the order of filming (which I assume they are) and not in the order they aired. Some interesting, if puzzling scheduling choices.
  19. 1 point
    Here’s Lucy is a viral sensation! More than a million people have watched this video!
  20. 1 point
    I watched Lucy Meets Orson Welles last night and it never occurred to me that, with the deletion of the scene with the Mertzes’ attempting Shakespeare, Fred only has a single line in the episode.
  21. 1 point
    I live in New York City and have been stuck in quarantine due to the Coronavirus, so being able to stream this show for free on Tubi has been a Godsend. I just finished "With Viv As A Friend, Who Needs An Enemy." I like this episode because of Vivian Vance, even though I don't think it's one of Bob and Madelyn's better efforts. As with "Lucy Goes On Her Last Blind Date," the final scene - where Lucy pretends to have gotten old overnight - isn't very well motivated, and it doesn't play as well as it should. Nonetheless, it's still head and shoulders above the episodes that Milt Josefsberg and crew were writing at that time.
  22. 1 point
    Miss Grant Takes Richmond has elements. Yours, Mine and Ours as well. Forever Darling was done in the 50s with Desi but it really isn't until the end camping you see TV Lucy.
  23. 1 point
    Rumormongering from the New York Daily News TV column December 1954:
  24. 1 point
    These photos from Lucy's first wedding to Phil turned up on Ebay. The wedding was in the backyard at Roxbury. The woman with Lucy/Lucie is identified as Mamma Hall. Any idea on who that is?
  25. 1 point
    An interview to promote Lucy Moves to NBC I had never read before:
  26. 1 point
    Well it looks like some people I know are at least interested. I'm hoping that 2 accounts I follow on IG who said they are going either post videos or go live for some of this.
  27. 1 point
    Yeah, it is interesting how exceptionally well Gomer Pyle, U.S.M.C. did especially compared to the other rural sitcoms of the day. One would think that Green Acres would have ruled the roost especially coming on right after the No. 1 show in America (previous seasons earlier) on Wednesdays. And also being different from the other rural comedies by being surrealistic and breaking the fourth wall. Yeah, Gale Gordon lost to Werner Klemperer one year and Don Knotts (from The Andy Griffith Show) another. What really bothers me though is that Don (great actor and one of the greatest second bananas I might add) just made a couple of appearances of Griffith and still managed to win the emmy meanwhile Gale practically appeared in every Lucy episode that season and didn't win. How is that possible? When it comes to Hogan's Heroes, I never understood the appeal of it. But to each his own. I know I have a friend who just loves that show but really isn't into Lucy whatsoever. And it just baffles me why MeTV is still airing it 10 at night for years on end. Really? How many times do viewers need to see every episode of that show? And even Andy Griffith or MASH? Not once has MeTV aired any Lucy show in prime-time. End of rant. Sorry.
  28. 1 point
    I don't know about that. Green Acres, Bewitched, I Dream of Jeannie, Get Smart and Gilligan's Island were all fresh sitcoms (and obviously in the their prime) during the 1965-1968 seasons. But The Lucy Show had the advantage because of its beloved star and being apart of CBS' Monday night power block since its inception. The others (with the exception of Bewitched and Green Acres) switched to different days during those 1965-1968 seasons. Thus making it harder for them to retain or even grow their audience. Although with Gilligan's Island, it is surprising that it didn't do better in its third and final season given that it was added to CBS's Monday night power block. One sitcom that, I can think of, that did better or did the same as The Lucy Show performance wise during those three seasons was Gomer Pyle, U.S.M.C. And that one also switched days (during its third season) and reverted back to its former timeslot/day the next season. The show's third season ratings weren't near as high as the previous two and once it changed back to its former timeslot the ratings went up. One conclusion that I can think of as to why Gomer performed better than the others and was on par with The Lucy Show is because of its star (Jim Nabors and the popularity of his Gomer character) and its association with the already popular The Andy Griffith Show.
  29. 1 point
    It took me a minute before my brain registered Fred & Ethel Fight, and I thought you were describing your actual current circumstances! Clever idea! If I had to pick and choose, I guess I'd toss the few Lucy dolls I collected out onto the awning, along with the original I Love Lucy DVDs with the full-color artwork. Given the bushfire threat we've been under, we still have emergency suitcases with valuables packed and ready. Maybe I'll learn from that and just pack up all my precious Lucy items into a padded suitcase to have waiting by the window at all times.
  30. 1 point
    Thread on All That Chat about Catherine https://www.talkinbroadway.com/allthatchat_new/d.php?id=2478616
  31. 1 point
    And he was just a kid when he brought Lucy over to NBC.
  32. 1 point
    Happy Birthday, Betty! I hope at some stage she's up to recording a second archive interview - her first one was back in the 90s, and as we all know, she's done a LOT more television since then.
  33. 1 point
    The title song of the Jerry Herman revue "Jerry's Girls" (set to "It's Today!") lists many of the famous women who have sung Jerry's songs including "Lucie Arnaz and her mother."
  34. 1 point
    While watching the new All In The Family there was a reference to speaking Spanish from Archie. Desi and Charo were mentioned. Watching the original tonight its interesting to hear it again. Incidentally Desi and Charo did a scene together on a Bob Hope special.
  35. 1 point
    So glad my audio came back into synch for this gorgeous Paris at Last!
  36. 1 point
    My favorite of the MADtv parodies was when Lucy and Ethel cut crack rocks in order to earn money for new dresses. They did so on a conveyor belt in their living room. So silly yet still funny.
  37. 1 point
    I've heard Joyce Van Patten's episode of the Gottfried show and it's great (just like every other episode), and I believe I've shared her comments here before. From what I remember, Joyce said that she and Lucy got along, but that Lucy seemed to want a closer friendship than Joyce was up for, which in turn made Lucy a little cold. I believe she also described Gary as "a very good valet", or something like that, which I find hilarious.
  38. 1 point
    I watched “Lucy’s Contact Lenses” again this morning. This is one of the better third season episodes, partly because it was written by Bob Schiller and Bob Weiskopf, but I agree with the posters upthread who noted that the dialogue wasn’t as “crisp” as the episodes they wrote with Bob and Madelyn. Bob and Madelyn had a flair for writing witty banter/repartee that the other writers couldn’t seem to replicate. I did notice two major plot holes in this episode though. First, Mr. Mooney says that he put Lucy’s fudge cake aside because his wife “thinks Lucy is the best baker in town,” when the second season finale (“Lucy Enters A Baking Contest,”) established that Lucy Carmichael doesn’t have much of a reputation as a baker. Second, Lucy tells Mr. Mooney that she made the second chocolate fudge cake for his sheepdog, Nelson, but chocolate is supposed to be poisonous to dogs. (Maybe they substituted gravy or something that looks like chocolate for the dog to eat in real life during the filming of this episode?) Aside from those quibbles though, I enjoyed this episode.
  39. 1 point
    BEWARE of anything written by Darwin Porter. He makes Boze Hadleigh look like Edward R Morrow----which is like saving Doris Ziffel makes Mother Burnside look like Mamie Van Doren.
  40. 1 point
    Courtesy of the wayback machine, I've been perusing the "Ask Lucie" archive from the former incarnation of Lucie Arnaz's website. One question from the 2001 section popped out at me: Was this our bored and talented webmaster, or by coincidence a different Brock from Canada?
  41. 1 point
    I'd imagine most of those were parodies. Have any shows ever recreated scenes line for line, though?
  42. 1 point
  43. 1 point
    #1. You could be right, but I have trouble picturing it. Did Angela ever do glamor in the movies? But even Angela could not have overcome THAT script with THAT direction. I don't know that anyone could have. One reviewer, while fairly positive about the movie, noted that "this Mame comes to the screen with considerable stuffing knocked out it" and "your enjoyment depends heavily on your memories of the original". When you do a musical of a play, you've got to eliminate roughly 45 minutes of plot to make room for the songs. Broadway: getting rid of the O'Banyon character also eliminates the absurd, hilarious comedy of him dating and MARRYING Agnes Gooch (falling for Mame's story that she is a wealthy heiress), but they had to ditch SOMETHING. The movie goes too far. Eliminating the plot thread of Mame's autobiography--a huge mistake. Because after Beau dies, there's a big hole where nothing much happens until we get to the Upsons. Yes, I suppose they had to follow the basic story line. But was there really any need to kill Beau off to make the rest of the plot work? The movie also eliminates the Babcock-Upson connection which was an even bigger mistake. But I've got the PERFECT solution! (later) #2. Though Mame depicts the years 1928-1948, it has a much more contemporary feel than Dolly. Other than the stock market crash, there are no historic references I can think of that make it a period piece. Both movies look like they were set in the year of their release. The colossal failure of the 1983 revival is baffling. And OF COURSE, there was some who blamed Lucy for tarnishing the reputation of the property.
  44. 1 point
    Got my sets today. The good news: All 38 Season One episodes are included in this two-volume release... for the first time EVER. And they've all been cleaned up and look pretty good. The bad news: All the episodes are edited. Most run between 22:10 and 22:40. The first eight and "Aunt Mattie Boynton" are about a minute longer though, and one episode in Volume II -- "Public Property On Parade," which hasn't been included in the series' syndication package in decades -- runs in the 24-minute range. I'm generally pleased. Splitting the season into two separate sets makes it pricey (especially given the edited content), but if we want to see more of this series, and more releases of similar series, this is an effort we have to support.
  45. 1 point
    I’d never heard that before and The Hogan Family is an excellent theory. As a fan of Valerie Harper and Jason Bateman, I enjoy the show and would have loved to see Gale on it. However, if it really was the role that Hillerman got, that was after the show had switched networks and only lasted for an additional 13 episodes- same as LWL!
  46. 1 point
    This is an interesting point. In 1990 or so, Gale said had successfully auditioned to join the cast or an established sitcom (reading between the lines, my unconfirmed theory is the role that eventually went to John Hillerman on The Hogan Family) but lost out in the end because either the network or producers were unable to ensure him due to his age.
  47. 1 point
    Yes, I’ve always thought if the series had continued, the kids parts should have been diminished. Not to the extent of the California Lucy Show years, but look at season three of The Lucy Show compared to season one.
  48. 1 point
    The Wikipedia page lists them in aired order but numbers them in production order. That'll help illustrate the discrepancy. And you're right, they did bump up the guest star showcases to try and help ratings. Was Bob Hope intended to make an appearance? I'd never heard that before!
  49. 1 point
    I never bought that explanation, personally, Lane was not only in demand on the small screen for all the cantankerous coots he played but he was a busy theater actor, too, which I'm pretty sure he maintained well into the sunset days of his career, so I don't buy the bs that he "couldn't remember his lines."
  50. 1 point
    I just watched an episode where Steve learns Spanish. Bub jokes, "I'm commencing to feel like Desi Arnaz's houseboy!"
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