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Rowan and Martin's Laugh-In: Complete Series DVD from TimeLife

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Mot Morenzi    1,466

http://www.tvshowsondvd.com/news/Rowan-Martins-Laugh-In-The-Complete-Series/23278

 

RowanAndMartinsLaughIn_Complete2017TL.jp

 

Before there was Saturday Night Live,

there was Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In"

- The New York Times

 

IN TIME FOR ITS LANDMARK 50TH ANNIVERSARY,

COMMEMORATE A GROUNDBREAKING VARIETY SHOW

WITH A DELUXE COMPLETE SERIES COLLECTOR'S

SET AVAILABLE FOR THE VERY FIRST TIME

 

ROWAN AND MARTIN'S LAUGH-IN:

THE COMPLETE COLLECTION

 

Time Life Brings Together All Six

Seasons (1968-1973) of This Emmy and

Golden Globe-Winning, Star-Laden,

Genre-Busting Series in One Stunning

DVD Set Featuring 140 Complete Episodes

Remastered from Original Broadcast

Masters - 63% of Which Have NEVER Been

Available Before on Any Format - Hours

of Specially-Produced Extras, a

2-Page Collector's Book and More!

 

Available Exclusively Online

at TimeLife.com/LaughIn;

Pre-Order Begins May 9, 2017

 

 

 

FAIRFAX, VA (May 9, 2017) - Named by TV Guide as one of the "50 Greatest TV Shows of All Time," Rowan and Martin's Laugh-In was also one of the most groundbreaking. A fast-moving barrage of rapid-fire one-liners, on-going sketches, musical numbers, and hilarious social and political satire, it was an instant hit following its NBC prime-time debut in 1968. Hosted by Dan Rowan and Dick Martin, the unique variety series - a psychedelic take-off of a '60s-style happening - perfectly captured the spirit of an era, launched the careers of many a comic actor and writer, and fed a new generation's conversations with hip catchphrases like "Sock it to me!," "You bet your sweet bippy!," and "Here come da judge!" Laugh In would go on to become one of the most popular shows in the history of television.

 

Never before available in its entirety on any format, beginning May 9, ROWAN AND MARTIN'S LAUGH-IN: THE COMPLETE COLLECTION will be offered as a deluxe 38-disc collector's set from Time Life and Proven Entertainment with David DiVona. Featuring all 140 original broadcast episodes plus the pilot, hours of specially-produced extras and featurettes, a bonus disc featuring hours of specially-produced extras, a 32-page collectible memory book featuring "liner notes" from producer/creator George Schlatter and more, ROWAN AND MARTIN'S LAUGH-IN: THE COMPLETE COLLECTION will be available to pre-order exclusively at TimeLife.com/LaughIn for $249.95.

 

"Laugh-In was a free fall of television without a net. It was dangerous. It was controversial. It was totally unpredictable and always funny." - George Schlatter

 

Laugh-In originally aired as a one-time special on September 9, 1967, and was such a success that it was brought back as a series, replacing The Man from U.N.C.L.E. on Mondays at 8pm. With seasoned comedy team Rowan and Martin presiding over the zippy hour-long variety show, which capably mixed sketch comedy and sight gags with trenchant political commentary, the comic regulars resonated loudly and hilariously - Goldie Hawn's giggly blonde, Lily Tomlin's snorting telephone operator, Judy Carne's "Sock-It-To-Me" girl, JoAnne Worley's anti-chicken-joke militant, Ruth Buzzi's perpetually-frustrated spinster, and Arte Johnson's "verrry interesting" German soldier, to name a few. And over the next six seasons, from 1968-1973, the off-the-wall NBC staple would become a pop culture phenomenon and the #1 rated show during the 1968-69 and 1969-70 television seasons.

 

The pioneering series - which would go onto to capture 6 Emmy Awards (for Outstanding Variety Series, 1971) and 31 nominations, as well as 2 Golden Globe Awards, including "Best TV Show" (1969) - can also be remembered by the seemingly endless parade of guest stars who flocked to the red-hot variety show for memorable appearances and cameos...including Tim Conway, Bob Newhart, Debbie Reynolds, Liberace, Raquel Welch, Sammy Davis, Jr., Jonathan Winters, Carol Channing, The Monkees, Sonny and Cher, Barbara Feldon, Bobby Darin, Andy Griffith, Diana Ross, James Garner, Michael Landon, Buddy Hackett, Steve Lawrence, Jack Lemmon, Kirk Douglas, Robert Goulet, Flip Wilson, Don Rickles, John Wayne, a ukulele-strumming Tiny Tim, and many more. The series' most famous single moment, however, came in 1968 when presidential candidate Richard Nixon surprised viewers with a brief appearance in which he deadpanned "Sock it to me?," before capturing the White House.

 

Initially, exclusively available online at TimeLife.com/LaughIn, ROWAN AND MARTIN'S LAUGH-IN: THE COMPLETE COLLECTION commemorates the influential program's landmark 50th anniversary with a handsomely-packaged DVD set from the TV-DVD archivists at Time Life. Across 38 discs and 150+ hours of transformative entertainment, fans of classic TV, comedy and variety will be treated to the series in its entirety for the very first time: all 140 episodes, complete and uncut and remastered from the original broadcast elements for optimal viewing. 89 of the episodes (63%) have never before been released on any format, making this eagerly-anticipated completist's set a valuable - and highly entertaining - collection.

 

Also included in the collection is the rare pilot episode, a collectible 32-page memory book loaded with archival photos, show images, classic jokes and one-liners, "liner notes" from creator/producer George Schlatter, and an exclusive bonus DVD.

 

The collection includes more than 6 hours of exclusive bonus features including the complete 25th Anniversary Cast Reunion and interviews with Lily Tomlin and George Schlatter that are only available in this complete collection.

 

Other exclusive bonus features include:

Interviews with Dick Martin, Ruth Buzzi, Gary Owens, Arte Johnson, Alan Sues

The Laugh-In Pilot Episode

Still Laugh-In: A Tribute to George Schlatter

Laugh-In Bloopers

How We Won the Emmys

...and more!

With the combined efforts and input from one of the most talented ensemble casts and the largest, most creative groups of writers, editors, composers, directors, scenic and costume designers ever assembled, Laugh-In became an instant classic, transforming pop culture and the medium of television. And today, 50 years after the show first aired, it remains one of the most memorable and beloved shows in TV history.

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JoeySoCal    1,005

http://www.tvshowsondvd.com/news/Rowan-Martins-Laugh-In-The-Complete-Series/23278

 

RowanAndMartinsLaughIn_Complete2017TL.jp

 

Before there was Saturday Night Live,

there was Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In"

- The New York Times

 

IN TIME FOR ITS LANDMARK 50TH ANNIVERSARY,

COMMEMORATE A GROUNDBREAKING VARIETY SHOW

WITH A DELUXE COMPLETE SERIES COLLECTOR'S

SET AVAILABLE FOR THE VERY FIRST TIME

 

ROWAN AND MARTIN'S LAUGH-IN:

THE COMPLETE COLLECTION

 

Time Life Brings Together All Six

Seasons (1968-1973) of This Emmy and

Golden Globe-Winning, Star-Laden,

Genre-Busting Series in One Stunning

DVD Set Featuring 140 Complete Episodes

Remastered from Original Broadcast

Masters - 63% of Which Have NEVER Been

Available Before on Any Format - Hours

of Specially-Produced Extras, a

2-Page Collector's Book and More!

 

Available Exclusively Online

at TimeLife.com/LaughIn;

Pre-Order Begins May 9, 2017

 

 

 

FAIRFAX, VA (May 9, 2017) - Named by TV Guide as one of the "50 Greatest TV Shows of All Time," Rowan and Martin's Laugh-In was also one of the most groundbreaking. A fast-moving barrage of rapid-fire one-liners, on-going sketches, musical numbers, and hilarious social and political satire, it was an instant hit following its NBC prime-time debut in 1968. Hosted by Dan Rowan and Dick Martin, the unique variety series - a psychedelic take-off of a '60s-style happening - perfectly captured the spirit of an era, launched the careers of many a comic actor and writer, and fed a new generation's conversations with hip catchphrases like "Sock it to me!," "You bet your sweet bippy!," and "Here come da judge!" Laugh In would go on to become one of the most popular shows in the history of television.

 

Never before available in its entirety on any format, beginning May 9, ROWAN AND MARTIN'S LAUGH-IN: THE COMPLETE COLLECTION will be offered as a deluxe 38-disc collector's set from Time Life and Proven Entertainment with David DiVona. Featuring all 140 original broadcast episodes plus the pilot, hours of specially-produced extras and featurettes, a bonus disc featuring hours of specially-produced extras, a 32-page collectible memory book featuring "liner notes" from producer/creator George Schlatter and more, ROWAN AND MARTIN'S LAUGH-IN: THE COMPLETE COLLECTION will be available to pre-order exclusively at TimeLife.com/LaughIn for $249.95.

 

"Laugh-In was a free fall of television without a net. It was dangerous. It was controversial. It was totally unpredictable and always funny." - George Schlatter

 

Laugh-In originally aired as a one-time special on September 9, 1967, and was such a success that it was brought back as a series, replacing The Man from U.N.C.L.E. on Mondays at 8pm. With seasoned comedy team Rowan and Martin presiding over the zippy hour-long variety show, which capably mixed sketch comedy and sight gags with trenchant political commentary, the comic regulars resonated loudly and hilariously - Goldie Hawn's giggly blonde, Lily Tomlin's snorting telephone operator, Judy Carne's "Sock-It-To-Me" girl, JoAnne Worley's anti-chicken-joke militant, Ruth Buzzi's perpetually-frustrated spinster, and Arte Johnson's "verrry interesting" German soldier, to name a few. And over the next six seasons, from 1968-1973, the off-the-wall NBC staple would become a pop culture phenomenon and the #1 rated show during the 1968-69 and 1969-70 television seasons.

 

The pioneering series - which would go onto to capture 6 Emmy Awards (for Outstanding Variety Series, 1971) and 31 nominations, as well as 2 Golden Globe Awards, including "Best TV Show" (1969) - can also be remembered by the seemingly endless parade of guest stars who flocked to the red-hot variety show for memorable appearances and cameos...including Tim Conway, Bob Newhart, Debbie Reynolds, Liberace, Raquel Welch, Sammy Davis, Jr., Jonathan Winters, Carol Channing, The Monkees, Sonny and Cher, Barbara Feldon, Bobby Darin, Andy Griffith, Diana Ross, James Garner, Michael Landon, Buddy Hackett, Steve Lawrence, Jack Lemmon, Kirk Douglas, Robert Goulet, Flip Wilson, Don Rickles, John Wayne, a ukulele-strumming Tiny Tim, and many more. The series' most famous single moment, however, came in 1968 when presidential candidate Richard Nixon surprised viewers with a brief appearance in which he deadpanned "Sock it to me?," before capturing the White House.

 

Initially, exclusively available online at TimeLife.com/LaughIn, ROWAN AND MARTIN'S LAUGH-IN: THE COMPLETE COLLECTION commemorates the influential program's landmark 50th anniversary with a handsomely-packaged DVD set from the TV-DVD archivists at Time Life. Across 38 discs and 150+ hours of transformative entertainment, fans of classic TV, comedy and variety will be treated to the series in its entirety for the very first time: all 140 episodes, complete and uncut and remastered from the original broadcast elements for optimal viewing. 89 of the episodes (63%) have never before been released on any format, making this eagerly-anticipated completist's set a valuable - and highly entertaining - collection.

 

Also included in the collection is the rare pilot episode, a collectible 32-page memory book loaded with archival photos, show images, classic jokes and one-liners, "liner notes" from creator/producer George Schlatter, and an exclusive bonus DVD.

 

The collection includes more than 6 hours of exclusive bonus features including the complete 25th Anniversary Cast Reunion and interviews with Lily Tomlin and George Schlatter that are only available in this complete collection.

 

Other exclusive bonus features include:

Interviews with Dick Martin, Ruth Buzzi, Gary Owens, Arte Johnson, Alan Sues

The Laugh-In Pilot Episode

Still Laugh-In: A Tribute to George Schlatter

Laugh-In Bloopers

How We Won the Emmys

...and more!

With the combined efforts and input from one of the most talented ensemble casts and the largest, most creative groups of writers, editors, composers, directors, scenic and costume designers ever assembled, Laugh-In became an instant classic, transforming pop culture and the medium of television. And today, 50 years after the show first aired, it remains one of the most memorable and beloved shows in TV history.

Wow! Am almost surprised this is seeing the light of day! The music clearances alone must have been a nightmare. :blink:

 

This is definitely one "for the vault"! :HALKING:

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Freddie2    827

Time Life is one of the guardian angels of classic television at this point. Any qualms about pricing must be overlooked in favor of the absolute miracle that so much of this is getting released.

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JoeySoCal    1,005

Time Life is one of the guardian angels of classic television at this point. Any qualms about pricing must be overlooked in favor of the absolute miracle that so much of this is getting released.

I couldn't agree more! Between this, "Mama's Family", Dana Delaney's "China Beach" and most impressively (importantly?) both/all incarnations released (to date, hopefully more will come!!) of TCBS, thank goodness for T/L considering other "boutique" labels like Shout! missed the boat on these WUNDAFUL titles/releases. 

 

Bravo, Time Life! :HALKING:

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JoeySoCal    1,005

I'm not interested unless Jo Anne Worley hand-picked the special features.

Why, otherwise it'll be BORRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRR--ING!!!?? :blink:

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Neil    1,325

If nothing else, "Laugh-In" was certainly a time-capsule of the era.

But I'll NEVER forgive it from depriving "The Lucy Show" was being #1 for the 67-68 season.

Going into the 2nd half of the 67-68 season, TLS was #1 until Laugh-In started to make slight inroads into the ratings.  Though L-I finished the season at #21, TLS's ratings declined slightly so it finished at #2 with a 27 rating behind the #1 Andy Griffith with a 27.6. As Harry Carter and I have pointed out numerous times.  And will continue to.  That bee will never leave our bonnets. 

 

Being opposite the hottest, hippest show on television would have spelled disaster for any other showing-its-age series in its 7th season (if you consider Here's Lucy the 7th season of The Lucy Show and why not, since the Gale Gordon-Lucy dynamic was virtually the same, as were the writers).  

Has there been a situation where this has happened?...that the #1 show's competition still managed to make the top 10?

In what was arguably L-I's hottest season 68-69, Here's Lucy still managed to place #9.  The 69-70 season had L-I retaining its #1 spot, and HL actually improving: up to #6. 

In a baffling comeback, Here's Lucy managed to out-rate Laugh in 70-71, emerging as CBS's top show (at #3) in what was Lucy's 9th year back on TV, knocking L-I down to #13 in its 4th season.  

The newness having worn off, Laugh-In, without HL as competition in 71-72 managed a #22 placing, bested by CBS's twice-roasted chestnut "Gunsmoke".  

But 72-73's ratings were bad enough that it was cancelled.

 

L-I hasn't aged particularly well.  Efforts to syndicate half-hour versions many years ago failed.  

I know it's just me, but it's that canned audience response that ruins a lot of L-I for me.

 

Rowan and Martin, both TLS veterans, were a passable comedy team, but along the lines of Gary Morton.   Professional but never a huge draw.  Until this show. 

L-I's most enduring player, Lily Tomlin, did not start until the 70-71 season when L-I had already started its decline.   Sure Goldie Hawn went on to win an Oscar (over Ingrid Bergman!!), but her ditzy character, one that made Georgette look intelligent,  was not exactly a forward-march for feminism. 

L-I wasn't all that funny in retrospect, but it was DIFFERENT.   With all those rapid-fire jokes and one-liners, if one flopped, it was on to another one.  

Editing videotape was quite new.  The quick cut presentation was not seen before on TV.  And that's what made it a hit.   But don't ask me: I only watched the first half-hour of it. 

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JoeySoCal    1,005

In a baffling comeback, Here's Lucy managed to out-rate Laugh in 70-71, emerging as CBS's top show (at #3) in what was Lucy's 9th year back on TV, knocking L-I down to #13 in its 4th season. 

Not that surprising, really: probably surged in no small part to the highly-publicized (and ultimately, rated) Liz & Dick season premiere episode.

 

Despite all the tsuris, hubbub and additional expense we learned about so many years afterward, it was pretty obviously worth it in more ways than one! :HALKING:

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Neil    1,325

Yes, the Burtons was the series highlight, BUT other than that episode, the third season is perhaps the weakest of all 6, with LBP approving scripts from an electric bag of freelance, and obviously desperate-for-work writers, all ill-equipped on the methods of constructing a good Lucy show.  

Other than the Burtons and these three:  "Jack Benny's Biography"  and "Lucy and Viv Go Hawaiian-parts 1 and 2", the rest of the season is unwatchable. 

All that "money we spent on the Burtons" made for the leanest guest star year of the series, top-loaded with guest-star-less bupkes: "20 20 vision" "Lucy's Vacation" "House Guest Harry", "Raffle" "Part-Time Wife" "Stops a Marriage" "Aladdin's Lamp" and the nadir "Ma Parker".  

I have to admit that "Rudy Vallee" is a guilty pleasure:  Rudy in that ill-fitting wig performing (terrible lipping) at the Hungry Hippie, which, it should be noted, has a decidedly middle-aged clientele,  with Lucy and Kim updated Rudy's standard with  "We are hip little cats who have grooved our way...yeah...yeah...yeah..."

I don't enjoy "Lucy the Crusader" although Fidelman says it's "one of the best episode of the ENTIRE (his caps) series".  Everyone has their own opinion, but I don't get the appeal of this one at all.  Is it funny?

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Freddie2    827

Can you imagine how much more clout TLS would have if it had been able to edge its way into first? Of all the years for Andy Griffith to be #1, its final season was not ideal.

I've never seen a full episode of Laugh-In, even though full episodes are on YouTube. Every time I've started one, I think to myself "They do this for a full HOUR?". A half hour format would seem better. All the bits and pieces I've seen present a very enjoyable show.

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Mot Morenzi    1,466

Yes, the Burtons was the series highlight, BUT other than that episode, the third season is perhaps the weakest of all 6, with LBP approving scripts from an electric bag of freelance, and obviously desperate-for-work writers, all ill-equipped on the methods of constructing a good Lucy show.  

Other than the Burtons and these three:  "Jack Benny's Biography"  and "Lucy and Viv Go Hawaiian-parts 1 and 2", the rest of the season is unwatchable. 

All that "money we spent on the Burtons" made for the leanest guest star year of the series, top-loaded with guest-star-less bupkes: "20 20 vision" "Lucy's Vacation" "House Guest Harry", "Raffle" "Part-Time Wife" "Stops a Marriage" "Aladdin's Lamp" and the nadir "Ma Parker".  

I have to admit that "Rudy Vallee" is a guilty pleasure:  Rudy in that ill-fitting wig performing (terrible lipping) at the Hungry Hippie, which, it should be noted, has a decidedly middle-aged clientele,  with Lucy and Kim updated Rudy's standard with  "We are hip little cats who have grooved our way...yeah...yeah...yeah..."

I don't enjoy "Lucy the Crusader" although Fidelman says it's "one of the best episode of the ENTIRE (his caps) series".  Everyone has their own opinion, but I don't get the appeal of this one at all.  Is it funny?

 

Most season 3 episodes I've seen only once, right after I first got the set. They were pretty unmemorable to me, as I can't really tell you any plots off the top of my head. One thing I do vividly remember is Harry's living room appearing in a few consecutive episodes, and having a different layout each time.

 

I actually didn't mind the brevity of guest stars. My favorite sitcom episodes of any show are seldom guest star spectacles. I'm very fond of what's come to be known as "bottle episodes" - episodes that primarily only feature the regular cast and sets. For that reason, I enjoyed "Aladdin's Lamp" a fair bit. A silly offering, to be sure, but it flowed well and was reasonably funny.

 

I guess "Crusader" sticks out for many people because the premise is actually grounded and strong, something rare for this show. I can't call it spectacular, but it's solid. My favorite scene is the one with Charles Nelson Riley. He singlehandedly stole that show, in my opinion. 

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JoeySoCal    1,005

I guess "Crusader" sticks out for many people because the premise is actually grounded and strong, something rare for this show. I can't call it spectacular, but it's solid. My favorite scene is the one with Charles Nelson Riley. He singlehandedly stole that show, in my opinion. 

 

For Here's Lucy, it (Crusader) is above-average, especially for this so-so season and CNR's guest turn is definitely a highlight.  Of course, "Ol' Soggy Crotch" getting wet as payoff is not only telegraphed from a mile away but well executed.  Also great, as always to have an appearance (although all too brief) by our own Mildred Cook. A stellar episode -- given most of the others from this season -- not only for the season but series overall.  

:peachonthebeach:

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Neil    1,325

Most season 3 episodes I've seen only once, right after I first got the set. They were pretty unmemorable to me, as I can't really tell you any plots off the top of my head. One thing I do vividly remember is Harry's living room appearing in a few consecutive episodes, and having a different layout each time.

 

I actually didn't mind the brevity of guest stars. My favorite sitcom episodes of any show are seldom guest star spectacles. I'm very fond of what's come to be known as "bottle episodes" - episodes that primarily only feature the regular cast and sets. For that reason, I enjoyed "Aladdin's Lamp" a fair bit. A silly offering, to be sure, but it flowed well and was reasonably funny.

 

I guess "Crusader" sticks out for many people because the premise is actually grounded and strong, something rare for this show. I can't call it spectacular, but it's solid. My favorite scene is the one with Charles Nelson Riley. He singlehandedly stole that show, in my opinion. 

 

You're right.  Many of these episodes are so similar that I can't tell one from another.  Like Lucy once said to her writers: "I'm asking for a raise AGAIN??"  Isn't there more than one episode where Lucy tries to get herself temporarily fired?   I prefer no guest star shows too, but at least it gave the writers an idea for a plot ("celebrity imposter" was a common one. Along with "I don't understand where that assistant the agency promised me is." followed by doorbell ring ).  And sometimes my opinion is based on only 1  viewing.  Viewed later, I discover there are parts that were enjoyable.  By the time of the 3rd season of HL, Lucy was competing against herself in my town.  Not in time-slot, but in quality.  A station started carrying I Love Lucy and the difference was astonishing.  It had only been 10 years since the last Lucy-Desi and she barely seemed like the same actress, in looks and performance.    And only 6 years since the last of the consistently good Lucy Shows (63-64).

So when you're hopeful that you'll get another "Electric Mattress" and instead get "20-20 Vision", it's a little disappointing.  

But I stuck in there!!  and was eventually rewarded with a good one here and there, usually a Bob-Madelyn. 

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Neil    1,325

Can you imagine how much more clout TLS would have if it had been able to edge its way into first? Of all the years for Andy Griffith to be #1, its final season was not ideal.

 

 

Or how about how much clout she had with CBS after Here's Lucy was the #1 show on CBS in 70-71 and the only sitcom in the top 14!  This was a season that brought us All in the Family (mid-year) and Mary Tyler Moore.  

Yes, it was strange that Andy Griffith reached #1 in its last lackluster year, it popularity carrying over to the even lacker-luster Mayberry RFD.   TAGS was never out of the top 10 of any season. Its stellar years were ignored by the Emmy nominating committee.  Don Knotts kept on winning though: 5 Emmys out of 8 seasons, the last 2 for returning guest shots.   TAGS as a series was nominated during its 1st, 2nd and 7th seasons. 

Never nominated were the writers of those great seasons (3,4 and 5).  Luckily the writers guild gave them a couple of awards for particular shows. 

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Freddie2    827

Or how about how much clout she had with CBS after Here's Lucy was the #1 show on CBS in 70-71 and the only sitcom in the top 14! This was a season that brought us All in the Family (mid-year) and Mary Tyler Moore.

Yes, it was strange that Andy Griffith reached #1 in its last lackluster year, it popularity carrying over to the even lacker-luster Mayberry RFD. TAGS was never out of the top 10 of any season. Its stellar years were ignored by the Emmy nominating committee. Don Knotts kept on winning though: 5 Emmys out of 8 seasons, the last 2 for returning guest shots. TAGS as a series was nominated during its 1st, 2nd and 7th seasons.

Never nominated were the writers of those great seasons (3,4 and 5). Luckily the writers guild gave them a couple of awards for particular shows.

When mentioned in tandem with her other shows, Here's Lucy is often depicted as the least successful (which is true) but even still, it got HUGE numbers! If I'm not mistaken, the season three premiere ranks pretty highly on the list of most-watched TV broadcasts.

It's strange to think that in 1970 so many households chose to watch Ma Parker and her Midgets over Mary Richards and the Bunkers (all on the SAME network no less!)

 

I partially credit TAGS's lack of Emmys- particularly writing Emmys- to the weird nature of the awards at the time. Categories seemed to be in a constant state of fluctuation.

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JoeySoCal    1,005

When mentioned in tandem with her other shows, Here's Lucy is often depicted as the least successful (which is true) but even still, it got HUGE numbers! If I'm not mistaken, the season three premiere ranks pretty highly on the list of most-watched TV broadcasts.

 

Well...that's kinda the thing, isn't it?? Hard as everyone (except perhaps critics) may try, even diehard fans have a hard time not comparing HL to the earlier, more "popular" (and critically-acclaimed) TLS and goes-without-saying ILL.  

 

History hasn't helped much either when you factor in that compared to its predecessors, HL hasn't done nearly as well and as a result, hardly played in syndication nor (from what I hear) in ancillary sales (i.e. the otherwise stellar DVDs) as again, it's predecessors, ILL in particular and given the quality (not to mention popularity) of each successive series, it's not all that surprising. Unfortunate perhaps...but unsurprising.

 

Of course IMHO it doesn't help that trying to watch a "butchered", edited for syndication edition of HL is almost as fun as a root canal, it hardly helps matters... while ILL at least when severely edited is still not only watchable but in comparison, downright enjoyable.   :vanda:

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likewow    14

I'm not as excited by the news of Laugh In on DVD as I might've been a few months ago. The broadcast channel Decades has been airing the hour long Laugh In , including the rare pilot and sixth seasons, so my curiosity about the show has been satisfied.

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Mot Morenzi    1,466

I'm not as excited by the news of Laugh In on DVD as I might've been a few months ago. The broadcast channel Decades has been airing the hour long Laugh In , including the rare pilot and sixth seasons, so my curiosity about the show has been satisfied.

For those of us without access to Decades, however, it's very welcome news :)

Plus all the bonus features and new interviews.

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likewow    14

For those of us without access to Decades, however, it's very welcome news :)

Plus all the bonus features and new interviews.

Yes, and I'm tempted to buy just to see the bloopers! My friends and I watched some on VHS way back. I'm curious if there will be any more than were shown on the three network clip shows?

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LittleRickyII    308

Yes, the Burtons was the series highlight, BUT other than that episode, the third season is perhaps the weakest of all 6, with LBP approving scripts from an electric bag of freelance, and obviously desperate-for-work writers, all ill-equipped on the methods of constructing a good Lucy show.  

Other than the Burtons and these three:  "Jack Benny's Biography"  and "Lucy and Viv Go Hawaiian-parts 1 and 2", the rest of the season is unwatchable. 

All that "money we spent on the Burtons" made for the leanest guest star year of the series, top-loaded with guest-star-less bupkes: "20 20 vision" "Lucy's Vacation" "House Guest Harry", "Raffle" "Part-Time Wife" "Stops a Marriage" "Aladdin's Lamp" and the nadir "Ma Parker".  

I have to admit that "Rudy Vallee" is a guilty pleasure:  Rudy in that ill-fitting wig performing (terrible lipping) at the Hungry Hippie, which, it should be noted, has a decidedly middle-aged clientele,  with Lucy and Kim updated Rudy's standard with  "We are hip little cats who have grooved our way...yeah...yeah...yeah..."

I don't enjoy "Lucy the Crusader" although Fidelman says it's "one of the best episode of the ENTIRE (his caps) series".  Everyone has their own opinion, but I don't get the appeal of this one at all.  Is it funny?

 

I've never understood all the hoopla about "Lucy, the Crusader."  It's just so-so to me.  But I love "Lucy and the Raffle," and "Lucy's Vacation."  I can't stand the Rudy Vallee episode, and "Ma Parker" is unwatchable.  And I have no fondness for those Hawaiian episodes -- either of them.  Ugh.

 

As for Laugh-In, I agree with your comments above.  It hasn't aged well, and I really never got why it was such a huge hit in the first place.  It's a dizzying barrage of silliness.  I think I only saw it once during its original run -- we could not pick up the NBC station very well at our house, but we tuned in one night anyway (and one night only) to see what all the fuss was about, but never watched again.  I did see reruns in the '80s and I didn't find it to be very funny.

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Freddie2    827

Season One is getting an individual release. Extras include an interview with George Schlatter, highlights from the 25th anniversary reunion, and bloopers. The SRP is $25, which isn't bad, considering that it'll probably be reduced like the individual Mama's Family seasons.

 

RowanAndMartinsLaughIn_S1_2017TL.jpg

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HarryCarter    1,022

Netflix will be showing a Laugh-In 50th anniversary special.

https://deadline.com/2019/03/rowan-and-martins-laugh-in-still-laugh-in-the-stars-celebrate-netflix-lily-tomlin-1202568687/

I know a lot of cast members have passed away in recent years, but it would be nice if they could have gotten others in addition to Lily and Jo Anne.

All the episodes of Laugh-In are currently available on Amazon Prime.

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