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Mmadluv7

Trivia Moment

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Mmadluv7    222

Well I didn't want to seem intrusive since we have our own trivia games here, but my friend Vic asked me to share it here, so I hope you dont mind- but its the blogs trivia moments!  Ill post them here and provide the answer when they are put up on the blog. I hope you like em! :)10306310_486014108165727_382713754735866

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leenorman    506

Trying to keep my old brain alive, I subscribe to e-mail Trivia Questions:  To date, it seems I can only get to the 50% level; I'm still trying to do better - HERE'S TODAY'S ENTRY - Damned if I didn't get it right!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


 


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TriviaTodaydotcom - “Question: What was the first TV series to be filmed before a live studio audience? Choices: All In The Family, The Honeymooners, Leave it to Beaver, (“I Love Lucy”) . . . Answer: Premiering in 1951, ('I Love Lucy') was the first television series to be filmed in front of an audience. This was made possible by the use of multiple cameras. This implementation allowed the show to benefit from the strengths of both stage plays (live audience) and film (camera angle options, point of view, etc.). This approach produced a perfect marriage between cinema and theater; television and plays. ('I Love Lucy') is often regarded as one of the greatest and most influential sitcoms in history,” posted this date in 2015.


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leenorman    506

'HISTORY' says so:  ANYONE????

 

  [You are partially correct, I believe; LIVE, w/AUDIENCE;  but, NOT with multiple cameras!!!!!]  ANYONE? 

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leenorman    506

I thought there were earlier shows that were filmed in front of an audience. Was Lucy actually the first to try this?

 Freddie2:  Just found, while researching Desilu Studios various name changes, etc., Wikipedia, which you may find VERY INTERESTING, indeed:  Here it is, for what it's worth to each of us - personally, I can't understand why this has not been disclosed publicly .....

 

Technological innovations [found this researching on wiki 5/20/15, Desilu background:

 

Desilu is often[who?] mistakenly credited with being either the first television studio to shoot on film instead of making a live broadcast, or as the first television studio to shoot on film with a multi-camera setup.[citation needed] However, neither is true. Earlier filmed series included Your Show Time, The Stu Erwin Show, and The Life of Riley; and Jerry Fairbanks had developed and was using multi-camera film production for television in 1950. Desilu has also been credited as first to use a multi-camera film setup before a live studio audience, however You Bet Your Life was produced using a multi-camera film set-up before a studio audience one year before I Love Lucy. On You Bet Your Life, the host, announcer and contestants stayed in their places. Karl Freund's innovative lighting set-up for I Love Lucy allowed performers to move freely about the stage set and be recorded by each film camera with proper lighting. Desilu began the creation of its productions using conventional film studio materials, production and processing techniques. The use of these materials and techniques meant that the 35 mm negatives (the source material for copyright purposes) were immediately available for production and distribution of prints when the Lucy series went into syndication at local stations around the country. As such there are no "lost" episodes of programs, or programs recorded by kinescope from the television broadcast. Through the use of orthodox Hollywood filming and production techniques, the content and quality of Desilu productions displayed a high standard from the very outset. Moreover, they were readily adaptable to either comedy or drama formats and were able to handle special effects or feature interior or exterior sets and locations with equal ease.

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