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Lucille Ball-Desi Arnaz Chronology - Week 3 - April


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April 16

 

Charlie Chaplin, Lucille Ball mentor, to whom she pays homage on The Lucy Show, Lucille, as the ‘tramp’, and Vivian Vance, the flapper, 1962; with Lucille, via archival footage: Hollywood Without Make-Up 1963; The Big Parade of Comedy 1964; and Legends of Comedy 1992; appears with Lucille, via archival footage, Entertaining the Troops 1994, is born this date in 1889.

 

John Hodiak, Lucille Ball early film-career co-star, 1946; appears with Lucille and Desi Arnaz, Toast of the Town, 1954, is born this date in 1914.

 

Barry Nelson, Desi Arnaz co-star, 1944; guest, Desilu Productions’, The Greatest Show on Earth, 1964; as well as Vacation Playhouse, 1967; is born this date in 1917.

 

Johnny Silver, guest co-star Desilu Productions’ The Untouchables, 1959, 1960, as well as Lucille Ball guest co-star, (“Here’s Lucy”), 1971, 1972, is born this date in 1918.

 

Henry Mancini, Composer; appears with Lucille Ball, via archival footage, That's Dancing! 1985; Composer of original music, The Great Race, starring, among others, Vivian Vance (Lucy's Ethel Mertz), 1965, is born this date in 1924.

 

Edie Adams, Desilu Productions’, The Walter Winchell Show, 1956; with husband, Ernie Kovacs; Ball-Arnaz’ guest co-star, 1960; Desilu Productions’ Here’s Hollywood, 1962; The Lucy Show, 1968; and American Masters “Finding Lucy”, 2000, is born on this date in 1927.

 

Lucille Ball and co-star, Richard Denning, appear My Favorite Husband, “Anniversary,” episode #84, the show in Lucille changes her character’s name from Liz Cugat to Liz Cooper - interesting real-world similarities between Lucille’s life and her role in film; i.e., always dreaming and plotting; her elopement in 1940; and later, two My Favorite Husband episodes, “Anniversary” 1949, and “Marriage License” 1950; discovering name misspelling and refusal of marital legitimacy until renewing of vows, as well as “The Marriage License” (“I Love Lucy”) 1952; and as in Dream Girl 1947, said episode airing this date in 1950.

 

[‘Research’ Note: This note appears with several dates of importance in prelude to Lucille and Desi’s performances moving them toward “I Love Lucy” which made history and will perpetuate.] CBS’ Sales Office, NYC, drew up a three-page document for mass circulation to agencies and other interested parties titled: “Available for Sponsorship . . . (‘I Love Lucy’), reflecting the ‘hard-sell’ approach: ‘the high caliber scripts that play such an important part in Lucille Ball’s radio success will make this show one of television’s most popular situation comedies,’” this date in 1951.

 

(“I Love Lucy”) “The Ricardos Change Apartments”, episode co-starring The Simmons Twins, as Little Ricky, wherein Lucy schemes to trade to a larger apartment, is filmed this date in 1953.

 

(“I Love Lucy”) “Lucy‘s Italian Movie” - the famous grape-stomping episode, guest co-star, Teresa Tirelli D’Amico, as the Vineyard boss, the infamous ‘fight’ never written into the original script - judged a fan favorite, with additional supporting cast member, Franco Corsaro, airing this date in 1956.

 

The 9th Annual Emmy Award ceremony airs this date in 1957.

 

Lucille Ball appears looking glamorous on NBC’s 60-minute A Bob Hope Special, airing this date in 1963.

 

Lucille Ball’s friend, guest co-star, and neighbor, Jack Benny Show’s final episode, with guest stars the Smothers Brothers, airing this date in 1965.

 

Lucie Arnaz guest co-stars, as Saunders McArthur, with Tom Laughlin, as Billy Jack, in Billy Jack Enterprises' Billy Jack Goes to Washington, also co-starring E. G. Marshall, and Suzanne Somers; as well as Don Keefer, Dick Gautier, and Pat O'Brien, airing this date in 1977.

 

Neville Brand, CBS’ Desilu Productions, The Texan, 1958; Westinghouse Desilu Playhouse, two episodes, 1959; The Scarface Mob, 1959; The Untouchables, three episodes, 1959, 1960, and 1961, and Alcatraz Express 1960; as well as guest, Desilu Studios-filmed, The Joey Bishop Show, 1962; dies this date in 1992.

 

The Post-Journal, Jamestown, NY - Lucy On e-Bay – Celoron to Post Statue of Lucille Ball on Internet Auction Web Site, by Patrick L. Fanelli: Celoron – “Standing more than 10 feet tall in Lucille Ball Memorial Park is a life-size statue of Lucille Ball designed and carved by area native David Weatherly in 2001 atop the trunk of a tree with a chain saw, and will be auctioned off on e-Bay to benefit the construction of a ‘Desi Arnaz Band Shell’, an idea invisioned by former Mayor Slagle and with area and Arnaz' Family donations, such Band Shell expected to be in place for the Summer Concert Season,” published this date in 2006.

 

Desi Arnaz IV and Lucie Arnaz appear on CBS' Entertainment Tonight, Mary Hart, Hostess, with Jennifer Anniston, Carol Burnett, Teri Garr, Florence Henderson, and Martin Sheen, among many others, airing this date in 2007.

 

April 17

 

Arthur Lake, of Dagwood Bumstead fame, co-star, William Frawley (Lucy's Fred Mertz), 1941, 1947; as well as with Lucille Ball, via archival footages, Hollywood Without Make-Up, 1963, is born this date in 1905.

 

William Holden, Lucille Ball’s early-film career co-star, 1949, and guest co-star, (“I Love Lucy”), 1955; with Lucille via archival footage Hollywood Without Makeup, 1963; guest star, CBS Salutes Lucy: The First 25 Years, 1976, as well as (“I Love Lucy”) 50th Anniversary Special, 2001, is born this date in 1918.

 

LA Examiner, Harriet Parsons: Lucille Ball, That Funny Tall Girl: “Practically everyone who saw Stage Door wants to know who ‘the funny tall girl who went home’ is. They know now – Lucille Ball – been promoted to comedy leads – 3 years ago, she was a fashion mannequin in NYC, brought to Hollywood by Samuel Goldwyn to be a show girl; she expected to stay 6 weeks; got a break in Ginger Rogers’ Roberta, and immediately signed by RKO; under tutelage of Lela Rogers, Ginger’s mother, head of studio talent school; good performance in Little Theater Plays on the lot, followed by several small roles; first real chance second femme lead in That Girl From Paris; then Stage Door convinced higher-ups she was valuable property; handed more important roles - now, RKO is planning to build her role into a star comedienne - used to go for aviation in a big way; but studio put a stop to that (has flown over the South American jungle, shooting crocodiles from the air); flew an open cockpit plane to rescue a boy marooned on the Lake’s ice near her childhood home in Jamestown NY; likes swimming and tennis; plays fast game of polo; is a skilled woodcarver; owns a profitable artificial flower shop in Hollywood; has blue eyes, blonde hair; has to eat fattening food to keep her weight up . . .” [‘Research’ Note: later proven to be mostly Studio public relations hype!], is published this date in 1938.

 

TV Guide cover: Lucille Ball appears with collage of stars, (Lucy at top of a drawing of a TV Star Totem Pole) this week in 1953.

 

CBS’ Sunday Lucy Show: 30 minutes black & white: This is a collection of (“I Love Lucy”) programs, (beginning April 3 until October 30) - with “The Ballet” (episode #19). Because so many home viewers requested to see the early episodes, as they did not have television sets when they originally aired, CBS and the Arnazes re-ran these shows in the late afternoon on Sundays, re-creating (“I Love Lucy”) twice weekly, commencing this date in 1955.

 

The 8th Annual Emmy Award ceremony airs this date in 1956.

 

Desilu Productions', Cavalcade of America, “The Jackie Jensen Story”, co-starring, among others, Ross Elliott, Vivi Janiss, and Stafford Repp, Don W. Sharpe, many-year associate of Desilu, Executive Producer, third of seven episodes, Desilu-produced, airs this date in 1956.

 

Near the end of the sixth year, Madelyn Pugh Davis and Bob Carroll, Jr., writing team for (“I Love Lucy”), often writing each other notes during their writer-partnership collaboration, a note was written by Bob: “I promise to never mention quitting again; I also promise to exhibit enthusiasm and, on occasion, to contribute Desilu Productions', Shower of Stars, “Episode 4.7”, with Jack Benny, Nanette Fabray, Betty Grable, and John Raitt, among others, airing this date in 1958.

 

NY Post, Ruth Preston: “Vivian Vance (Lucy’s Ethel Mertz): No More House-dresses,” published this date in 1969.

 

LA Times, Lee Margulies: “Lucie Throws Her Series Into the Ratings Ring,” published this date in 1985.

 

Dick Shawn, appears with Lucille Ball and Desi Arnaz Toast of the Town 1955; Desilu Studios-filmed, That Girl, 1967; Lucille Ball guest co-star, 1968, dies this date in 1987.

 

Lucille Ball, hospitalized for the last time, this date in 1989.

 

Burlington (Iowa) Hawk-Eye, Chuck Gysi: “TV’s Fred Mertz (William Frawley) Had Burlington Roots,” published this date in 1994.

 

Kitty Carlisle Hart, Lucille Ball early-film career co-star, 1934; dies this date in 2007.

 

From The Hollywood Reporter, Salma Hayek, and the cast of English's upcoming film "The Women" will be honored at the 2008 Crystal Lucy Awards, set for June 17 at the Beverly Hilton. The 2008 Lucy Award for excellence in television, named in honor of Lucille Ball, will be presented to Hayek, the actress/director/producer who serves as Executive Producer of ABC's "Ugly Betty." The annual dinner marks the 35th anniversary of Women in Film and supports WIF, LAs (headed by President Jane Fleming) and its educational and philanthropic programs, posted on Everything Lucy Website, on this date in 2008.

 

April 18

 

Avril Angers, known as the “Lucille Ball of the United Kingdom” is born in Liverpool, England, this date in 1918.

 

Virginia O’Brien, along with husband, are good friends of Lucille & Desi’s at Chatsworth; Lucille Ball early-career co-star, 2 films, 1943, 1944; and with Lucille and William Frawley (Lucy's Fred Mertz), 1946; is born this date in 1919.

 

Irene Kampen, writer, also credited as Irene Kampton, 35 episodes, The Lucy Show, 1962-1967, based on her first Doubleday book, Life Without George 1961, is born this date in 1922.

 

Bob Hastings, Desilu Productions’, The Untouchables, 1959, as well as Lucille Ball guest co-star, (“Here’s Lucy”), 1970, is born this date in 1925.

 

NY Sun: 20th Century postscript: “William Frawley (Lucy’s Fred Mertz) will not get the movie role based on his successful stage performance character,” published this date in 1933.

 

Hollywood Citizen News, Throng Agog at Carnival, Encino, 4/18 – “Lucille Ball mugged it around a slatted jail on-stage at the Country Carnival put on by Encino Chamber of Commerce, seven thousand packed Edward Everett Horton’s Barn and had eyes only for the radio and movie stars performing . . .” published this date in 1944.

 

(“I Love Lucy”) was rated Nielsen #1 on Television in America (23 million viewers from 9.5 million homes) this date in 1952.

 

(“I Love Lucy”) “Lucy’s Schedule,” an episode guest co-starring Gale Gordon, as new owner of the Tropicana, is filmed this date in 1952.

 

Desi Arnaz and Orchestra, perform (“I Love Lucy”) “The Star Upstairs,” Cornell Wilde guest co-stars, Lucy gets trapped in his apartment, after she rangled his room number from supporting cast member Robert Jellison, the bellboy, and airing this date in 1955.

 

Lucille Ball appears in Life Magazine this date in 1955.

 

Lucille Ball and Desi Arnaz receive the highest Cuban civilian award, the Order of Carlos Manuel de Cespedes in honor of their contributions to American humor, in Miami this date in 1956.

 

Melody Thomas Scott, star, The Young and the Restless, original Member, Lucille Ball-Desi Arnaz Museum Board of Directors; Headliner, Lucille Birthday Days, 2000, 2005; as well as Lucy-Desi Days 2008, is born this date in 1956.

 

Lucille Ball and Bob Hope appear together on Chicago Tribune TV Week cover this week in 1964.

 

Jamestown Post Journal: Here We Go Again – “Collage pictures of Lucille Ball and Bob Hope’s current and previous ventures into comedy together – this time The Lucille Ball Comedy Hour: ‘Mr. and Mrs.’ - a play within a play, which ‘suggests’ the actual life of Lucille and Desi Arnaz; but, only coincidentally,” published this date in 1964.

 

Lucille Ball and Bob Hope star in The Lucille Ball Comedy Hour: “Mr. and Mrs” - executive produced by Jess Oppenheimer; directed by Jack Donohue, and co-starring Lucy veterans John Banner, Stanley Farrar, Gale Gordon, Sid Gould, William Lanteau, Joseph Mell, and Jack Weston, among others, airing this date in 1964.

 

Vivian Vance (Lucy’s Ethel Mertz) appears, as Actress, on CBS’ 30-minute Sam – the final episode – with George Gobel co-starring, as her husband; also starring Paul Burke and Mark Harmon, airing this date in 1978.

 

Lucille Ball suffers a heart attack at Beverly Hills home in early morning hours (subsequently undergoes eight hours of open heart surgery at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center), on this date in 1989.

 

NY Times, Wendy Wasserstein: “Rebel in a Housedress,” published this date in 1999.

 

Frances Rafferty, b. 6/16; Lucille Ball co-star, 1943; 1945; Desilu Productions’, Cavalcade of America, 1954; as well as December Bride, 111 episodes, 1954-1959; dies this date in 2004.

 

The Buffalo News – Entertainment – by Mary Kunz Goldman - News Classical Music Critic – “The Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra presents ‘Marvin Hamlisch's 'They're Playing Our Song' with Robert Klein and Lucie Arnaz’ - “In 1979, Robert Klein and Lucie made ‘They're Playing Our Song’ a hit on Broadway. Now, they appear together at Kleinhan’s Music Hall. With Marvin Hamlisch presiding over a Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra pops evening of Broadway hits topped by a semi-dramatized treatment of ‘They're Playing Our Song.’ Klein and Arnaz will be playing the lead roles, just as they did 30 years ago”, published this date in 2008.

 

April 19

 

Hugh O’Brien, star of Desilu Productions’, Desilu Studios'-filmed, Wyatt Earp, 164 episodes, 1955-1961; Lucille Ball and Desi Arnaz’ co-star, Westinghouse Desilu Playhouse, 2 episodes, 1959, 1960; as well as appears with Lucille in Swing Out, Sweet Land, with many other stars, 1970, is born this date in 1923.

 

Dick Sargent, played the second Darrin on Bewitched until 1972; Westinghouse Desilu Playhouse, 1960, Kraft Mystery Theater, 1962; and Lucille Ball guest co-star, (“Here’s Lucy”), 1973; is born this date in 1930.

 

Elinor Donahue, co-star, Desilu Productions’ Here’s Hollywood” 1962; U.S. Marshal, (unknown year); and Star Trek, 1967, is born this date in 1937.

 

Lucille Ball appears on Sunday News: New York’s Picture Newspaper cover this date in 1942.

 

Film Daily, Sorrowful Jones, Paramount: Serviceable Damon Runyon story. “Neat combination of emotion played against comedy. It has many laughs; Bob Hope and an able supporting cast, including Lucille Ball,” published this date in 1949.

 

(“I Love Lucy”) “The Black Wig” - a rehashing of an episode entitled “The Diner,” with Lucy and Ethel plotting against Ricky and Fred, an idea taken from My Favorite Husband “Hair Dyed,” with veteran Lucy supporting cast members, Bennett Green, Desi Arnaz’ stand-in; Douglas Evans, Eve McVeagh, and Louis A. Nicoletti, airing this date in 1954.

 

Desilu Studios'-filmed, ABC My Three Sons, “Robbie The Caddy”, William Frawley (Lucy’s Fred Mertz), as Michael Francis 'Bub' O'Casey; co-stars with Fred MacMurray, as Steve Douglas, Tim Considine, as Mike Douglas; Don Grady, as Robbie Douglas, Peter Brooks, as Hank Ferguson; Stanley Livingston, as Chip Douglas; Louis Nicoletti, as Caddy Master; with James A. Paisley, Production Manager/Supervisor, 36 episodes, 1960-61, airs this date in 1962.

 

CBS’ The Lucille Ball Comedy Hour: Mr. and Mrs., guest starring Bob Hope and Gale Gordon - Lucille plays a studio owner during the first half of the special, trying to get Bob Hope for a television special; the second half devoted to a mock-up of a Broadway play - greatly shortened - Lucille and Bob portraying husband and wife, make a television special, without an audience, with Jess Oppenheimer, writer/creator, producing his first work with Lucille since (“I Love Lucy”). Jess’ fine production values and timing strikingly evident and first-rate, also starring veteran Lucy supporting cast member, Bennett Green, airing originally in black and white, this date in 1964.

 

NY Times Larry Glenn: “Bob Hope Bounces a Ball Name Lucy,” published this date in 1964.

 

Franco Corsaro, co-star, William Frawley (Lucy's Fred Mertz), 1943; Lucille Ball co-star, 1945; supporting cast member, (“I Love Lucy”), 1956; as well as Desilu Productions', Desilu Studios'-filmed, The Texan, 1959, dies this date in 1982.

 

Desert Magazine (Palm Springs): “Heart Attack Forces Ball Into Surgery,” published this date in 1989.

 

LA Times, Jack Jones: “Lucille Ball Stricken: Has Heart Surgery,” published this date in 1989.

 

Press-Enterprise, (Riverside, California), Jeff Wilson: “Lucille Ball Survives Heart Attack, Seven-Hour Surgery,” published this date in 1989.

 

Chillicothe Constitution-Tribune (MO) - “Lucille Ball recovering from surgery,” published this date in 1989.

 

Ruth Hussey, guest Desilu Productions', Shower of Stars, 1955; guest Desilu Studios-filmed, The Red Skelton Show, 1956, 1958; co-star, Lucille Ball, 1960, dies this date in 2005.

 

The Buffalo News – Entertainment – by Mary Kunz Goldman - News Classical Music Critic – “The Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra presents "Marvin Hamlisch's 'They're Playing Our Song' with Robert Klein and Lucie Arnaz” - “In 1979, Robert Klein and Lucie Arnaz made "They're Playing Our Song" a hit on Broadway. Now, they appear together at Kleinhans Music Hall. With Marvin Hamlisch presiding over a Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra pops evening of Broadway hits topped by a semi-dramatized treatment of ‘They're Playing Our Song.’ Klein and Arnaz will be playing the lead roles April 20th, just as they did 30 years ago”, published for the week of April 18-25, this date in 2008.

 

April 20

 

Harold Lloyd, appears with William Frawley (Lucy's Fred Mertz), 1938; producer, long-time friend and mentor of Lucille Ball; producer, Lucille early-career film, 1941; Hedda Hopper’s Hollywood 1960, Desilu Productions’, Here’s Hollywood, 1962; with Lucille, archivally, Legends of Comedy 1992; as well as Bob Monkhouse's Comedy Heroes 2004, is born this date in 1893.

 

Bruce Cabot, Lucille Ball early film-career co-star, 1934, 1949, 1950 and Desilu Productions’ Here’s Hollywood, 1961, is born this date in 1904.

 

Josephine Turner, a Mexican immigrant, started working at Max Factor in 1927, soon becoming the head of the wig department, making all of Lucille Ball's wigs and hairpieces for 50 years, is born this date in 1909.

 

William Frawley, (Lucy’s Fred Mertz) stars in Central Theater’s The Gingham Girl, as Jack Hayden, starting this date in 1923.

 

Nina Foch, guest co-star, Desilu Productions', The Greatest Show on Earth, 1963; as well as co-star, Vivian Vance (Lucy's Ethel Mertz) The Great Houdini, 1976, is born this date in 1924.

 

Ryan O'Neal, guest, Desilu Productions', The Untouchables, 1960; appears with William Frawley (Lucy's Fred Mert), My Three Sons, 1962; with Desi Arnaz IV, on Salute to Oscar Hammerstein II, 1972; as well as appears with Lucille Ball, 62st Annual Academy Awards, 1989, is born this date in 1941.

 

(“I Love Lucy”) “No Children Allowed” - Veteran supporting cast member, Elizabeth Patterson, makes her debut as Mrs. Trumbull, as do the Simmons twins, as Little Ricky - Lucille’s first appearance since delivering Desi IV and commencement of maternity leave 11/14/52, with supporting cast members, Vivi Janiss, Charlotte Lawrence, Margie Liszt, Peggy Rea and Kay Wiley, airing this date in 1953.

 

Desi Arnaz wrote a note to himself: “I have come to the terrible realization that my wife doesn’t love me. She is unable to forgive me my misconduct;” perhaps, to blunt problems in their marriage - thereafter seemed to focus his attentions on Desilu Productions, this date in 1954.

 

NY Times Magazine, “ . . . producer and director of the hour-long productions had come to the ranch with a rough cut of product and Desi and they would dispute various points; then, Lucille would speak, and the arguments would stop and each man would say she was expressing exactly what he meant,” this date in 1958.

 

Desilu Productions', Desilu Playhouse, The Scarface Mob, (AKA) The Untouchables, part one, written, in part, by Elliot Ness; Desi Arnaz, Executive in Charge of Production; Quinn Martin, Producer; Jack Aldworth, Associate Producer, Bert Granet, Executive Producer, W. Argyle Nelson, long-time associate of Lucille Ball and Desi Arnaz, as Production Supervisor; co-starring, Neville Brand, as Al Capone; Robert Stack, as Elliot Ness, and Pat Crowley, Bruce Gordon, Lou Krugman, Peter Leeds, Paul Picerni, Walter Winchell, Bill Williams, and Keenan Wynn, among many others; with Dann Cahn, Second Unit Director; James Paisley, Production Manager; Wilbur Hatch, Original Music; with Charles West, Art Department, original air date this date in 1959.

 

Alcatraz Express, part of Desilu Productions’ The Untouchables series, Desi Arnaz, Executive in Charge of Production – co-starring, Neville Brand, as Al Capone; Robert Stack, as Eliot Ness, with Charles Lane, Paul Picerni, veteran supporting cast members in all things Lucy – the second feature length release, transferring the person of Al Capone from the Federal Penitentiary in Atlanta to Alcatraz, airing in 1960.

 

An exhausted Lucille Ball collapses on stage during a Wildcat performance [the musical closes after only 171 performances - over $165,000 in advance ticket sales are refunded] this date in 1961.

 

Keith Thibodeaux, Little Ricky (“I Love Lucy”) appears for the first time since 1960, (The Lucy Show) “Lucy is a Process Server” - Lucy, having taken a job in an attorney’s office, tracks Mooney down to serve him a subpoena, airing this date in 1964.

 

NY Times, “TV: Corny but Clever: Hope-Ball Special,” published this date in 1964.

 

Robert Armstrong, William Frawley (Lucy's Fred Mertz) co-star, 1942, and The Silver Theatre, 1950; as well as Desilu Studios-filmed, The Red Skelton Hour, 1957, dies this date in 1973.

 

Desert Magazine (Palm Springs): “Fans After Lucy’s Attack,” published this date in 1989.

 

Desert Magazine (Palm Springs), Michael Fleeman: “Fans Wish Ball the Best After Heart Attack,” published this date in 1989.

 

LA Times, Charissa Jones: “An Outpouring by Fans: They Really Do Love Lucy,” published this date in 1989.

 

Press-Enterprise, (Riverside, California): “The Fans Show They Love Lucy,” published this date in 1989.

 

The Latest From Everything Lucy Website – “The Lucy Show – The Official First Season DVD is coming, finally, after all these years of waiting. The Official First Season is distributed by Paramount Home Entertainment, CBS DVD, containing all 30 episodes (in black and white) from the first season, and includes a new interview by Lucie Arnaz, with rare commercial footage from the Show!, and will be in stores on July 21st,” posted this date in 2009.

The Post-Journal, Readers' Forum - Time to Mark Lucy's Birthplace - “To the Readers' Forum, C. Ralph Heeter - When one looks around the City of Jamestown, you will see many historical markers noting anything from neighborhood sites, office sites and armory locations to historical figures like Reuben Fenton; but, one of Jamestown's most-famous-internationally-known figures, Lucille Ball, was born here and there is no historical marker for her birthplace. From the book Love, Lucy, by Lucille Ball, with Betty Hannah Hoffman, on page 4, are the words: 'but I was born in my grandparents' apartment on Stewart Street, Jamestown, NY, where I was delivered by my Grandmother, Flora Belle Hunt.' From a web site reflecting another autobiographical account, she specifically stated that her grandmother lived at 123 Stewart. ...but a quick check of Stewart Avenue shows no house number that reaches anywhere near 123, and there is no plaque anywhere on the street to indicate the location... Looking at a map of the City of Jamestown for 1911 ... Stewart Street is lined out at each of two streets. The City Directory for 1911 shows that Fred C. Hunt, family of 5, lived at 123 Stewart Avenue, in one of three apartments existing at that location. The final solution to Lucille Ball's birthplace came when the two-year street directories for 1913-4 and 1915-6 were viewed, showing a numbering change. Although none of the residents remained over the two-year period publication, the next neighbors at 115 and 117 did remain, revealing their new numbers at 57 and 59, while 123, the next house up from 117, became 69; leaving no question about 69 Stewart Avenue as being the birthplace of Lucille Ball. It would be nice if a historical marker plaque could be processed and located this year in time for Lucille's 100th Birthday Celebration,” published this date in 2011.

 

Madelyn Pugh Martin Davis, b. 3/15; one of the ‘legendary team of writers, (“I Love Lucy”), 174 episodes 1951-57; Desilu Productions’, Those Whiting Girls, 1955; (“I Love Lucy”) Christmas Show, 1956; The Lucy-Desi Comedy Hour 2 episodes, 1958; Westinghouse Desilu Playhouse, 1 episode, 1958; Script Consultant, The Lucy-Desi Comedy Hour, 1 episode, 1960; Desilu Productions', Vacation Playhouse, 1 episode, 1963; The Lucy Show Script Supervisor, 1 episode, 1962; 2 episodes, 1963, Script Supervisor 1 episode, 1962; 1 episode, 1966; Producer, Desilu Productions', unsold television pilot, The Carol Channing Show, 1967; Desilu Productions', The Mothers-In-Law, 51 episodes, 1967-69, as Creator, Writer; Script Consultant, 1 episode, 1967; Writer/story, Yours, Mine and Ours, 1968; (“Here’s Lucy”), 7 episodes, 1970-1973; Producer, Desi Arnaz Productions', Alice, 92 episodes, 1977-81; Co-producer, Lucy Calls the President, 1977; Co-Producer, Writer, unknown episodes, Life With Lucy, 1986; (“I Love Lucy”); guest, The Very First Show! 1990; Lucy and Desi: A Home Movie”, 1993; American Masters: “Finding Lucy”, 2000; Writer, (“I Love Lucy”) 50th Anniversary Special, 2001; guest, The Desilu Story, 2003; with Lucille and Desi, archivally, TV Land Moguls “The 50's”, 2004; as well as appears with Lucille and Desi, archivally, Make 'Em Laugh: The Funny Business of America, 2009; dies this date in 2011.

 

April 21

 

Eveline Hunt, Lucille Ball’s maternal great-grandmother, wife of Reuben Hunt, is born this date in 1838.

 

Anthony Quinn, guest co-star, Desilu Productions’ Here’s Hollywood 1961; Night of 100 Stars, with Lucie Arnaz 1982; as well as with Lucille Ball, via archival footage, The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson 1992, is born this date in 1915.

 

LA Evening Herald Express, Harrison Carroll: “Lucille Ball and her cousin, Cleo Mendico (sic), 2:00 a.m., are held up and robbed by two bandits, who warn them not to call the police. They were so frightened, they didn’t!!” published this date in 1936.

 

Lucille Ball appears on CBS Radio’s The Lady Esther Screen Guild Theatre, “Too Many Husbands”, co-starring Bob Hope and Frank Sinatra, on this date in 1947.

 

Film Daily, Hollywood-Vine Yard, Ralph Wilk: “Lucille Ball and Bob Hope (Sorrowful Jones) will team up again, Where Men Are Men, Paramount’s Technicolor treat,” published this date in 1949.

 

Desi Arnaz and Orchestra perform, (“I Love Lucy”) “Cuban Pals” - (major plot theme for The Mambo Kings, Desi Arnaz IV stars as his father, years later), when Lucy gets one of Ricky’s band fired by replacing her, an episode suggesting Desi has not been back to Cuba since emigrating, guest cast, Lita Baron and Rita Conde, and supporting cast member, Alberto Morin , airing this date in 1952.

 

The Hollywood Reporter, “On the Air” with Dan Jenkins: “ . . . gives credit for the success of (‘I Love Lucy’) to Desi Arnaz” . . . “goes above all to Desi Arnaz, the crazy Cuban whom Oppenheimer insists has been the real producer all along and who in two weeks reluctantly starts taking screen credit as executive producer,” published this date in 1952.

 

Look Magazine cover: Lucille Ball, Desi Arnaz, Lucie and Desi Arnaz IV appear: “Lucy’s Two Babies,” by Jess Oppenheimer, producer, creator, writer (“I Love Lucy”), this date in 1953.

 

CBS’ The Lucy Show – 30-minutes, black & white – this is not a misprint, nor Miss Ball’s classic 1960’s sitcom. The re-runs of (“I Love Lucy”) on Sundays had done so well for CBS they decide to add this extra night of (“I Love Lucy”) re-runs on Saturdays in the very early evening. New graphics are made to reflect the change of title and sponsor this date in 1956.

 

Desi Arnaz is issued a United States of America Passport on this date in 1959.

 

The Lucy Lounge Website (posted 11/21/2008 by bweir) – “Lucille Ball takes part in Ralph Bellamy Day, Charity Baseball Game Event in Central Park, with, among others, Julie Andrews, Catcher, and Joe E. Brown, Umpire, played yesterday, pictures by Corbis Photo Agency”, this date in 1961.

 

Desilu Productions', The Greatest Show on Earth “There Are No Problems, Only Opportunities”, starring Jack Palance, as Johnny Slate, co-starring, Edgar Bergen and Barry Nelson, among others, airs this date in 1964.

 

Jamestown Post Journal: Sunday on Television: “‘Day Like Today’ - Good But, Lucille Ball Corny”, by Cynthia Lowry, AP Television-Radio Writer – New York (AP) – “Lucille Ball and Bob Hope, who enjoy performing together, had an hour’s romp on CBS’ Sunday night, a comedy that, by almost any standard, was both corny and old hat. They played Bonnie and Bill, ‘Mr. and Mrs. America,’ the nation’s most-popular television couple. After trading wisecracks and making fun of Madison Avenue advertising agency men, they introduced a plot - they were not married at all – loathed each other – and then ordered by their sponsor to have a baby to lift their sagging rating,” published this date in 1964.

 

Desi Arnaz Productions', NBC’s Land’s End, Desi Arnaz, Director/Writer of theme music: “I Love You”/Creator; with Mort Briskin, Producer; Dann Cahn, Associate Producer/guest actor (uncredited); Wilbur Hatch, Music Supervisor - the owner of a small Mexican hotel and the local sheriff assist travelers and natives in trouble - starring Rory Calhoun, as Mark, Gilbert Roland, as Bravo, and Martin Milner, as Eric, airs this date in 1968.

 

CBS’ The Lucy Show - While each of Lucille Ball’s series has always gone on summer hiatus, selected re-runs of the show are aired in prime time instead of a summer replacement series, commencing March 24. The remaining weeks are re-runs for the first time in color from the series’ last three seasons (1965-68) on this date in 1969.

 

Desi Arnaz appears on The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson, on this date on 1972.

 

Gummo Marx, of the infamous Marx Brothers, Lucille Ball’s friend and co-star, dies this date in 1977.

 

Robert Jellison, veteran supporting cast member (“I Love Lucy”) 1952, 1955, dies this date in 1980.

 

Patty Ann Gerrity, star, Desilu Productions’, This is Alice, 39 episodes, 1958; guest, Whirlybirds, 1958; as well as Desilu Studios'-filmed, The Betty Hutton Show, 1960, dies this date in 1991.

 

Peter Lind Hayes, Lucille Ball and Desi Arnaz’ friend of many years; guest, Desilu Productions', Shower of Stars, 1955; dies this date in 1998.

 

Charles “Buddy” Rogers, Lucille Ball’s early-film careeer co-star, 1935, dies this date in 1999.

 

CBS’ News Productions – TV Land - Desi Arnaz appears, via archive footage, a documentary series of unknown episodes, broadcast this date in 2004.

 

The Latest From Everything Lucy Website - “Lucy’s Laugh Enlivens the Solar System” - “We make a lot of noise here on Earth with our TV and radio broadcasts and some of that sound escapes into space; but, how far will those signals travel? Is someone or something in the distant universe hearing Lucille Ball in the sky right now? According to National Public Radio, (“I Love Lucy”) passed Proxima Centauri, the nearest star to our sun, around 1955 and has now moved past about 200 stars and who knows how many planets. When Lucy's signal first left Earth in 1951, it was much, much louder than the hum of background radiation; but, the farther waves go, the weaker they become; so, while the signal may travel forever outward, it eventually will become impossible to detect,” posted this date in 2008.

 

The Latest From Everthing Lucy Blog -("I Love Lucy"): Writer, Madelyn Pugh Davis Dies at 90 - “A female pioneer of the sitcom world has died. Madelyn Pugh Davis, one of the few main writers of ('I Love Lucy'), died last night. Pugh was editor of the Shortridge High School newspaper, Indianapolis, Indiana, and graduated from Indiana University School of Journalism, 1942. She wrote radio spots, WIRE, local radio station. Her family moved to California, and she worked regular writing jobs, NBC and CBS. Pugh was often the only female writer for a show. Pugh, working as staff writer for CBS Radio, Hollywood and met writing partner, Bob Carroll, Jr. The partnership lasted 50+ years, until his death, January, 2007. They wrote 400+ TV episodes and radio shows during their partnership. The duo was writing for The Steve Allen Show when they began writing for My Favorite Husband, radio show starring Lucille Ball, and were hired by producer, Jess Oppenheimer, and wrote for My Favorite Husband two-plus years. Pugh and Carroll authored a vaudeville-style act for Ball and Arnaz. This became the basis for the ('I Love Lucy') pilot. The show became a series; Oppenheimer, Pugh, and Carroll wrote 39 episodes each year for the first four seasons. Oppenheimer left; and Bob Schiller and Bob Weiskopf wrote with the duo beginning in year five and continued with the show until the end. Pugh would test out Lucy's crazy stunts, to make sure they worked, and to protect Ball. Pugh and Carroll never won an Emmy for their work; but, were nominated 3 times. Arnaz and Ball trusted the duo and they worked many projects for them. They wrote multiple episodes for all of Ball’s later series; The Lucy Show, ("Here's Lucy"), and Life With Lucy. Pugh and Carroll wrote for Those Whiting Girls, a Desilu Productions' product. Along with Desi Arnaz, they created The Mothers-in-Law and produced Alice for 92 episodes, Pugh was married two times, to legendary TV producer, Quinn Martin, producing a son, Michael Quinn Martin. She later married Dr. Richard M. Davis, a college sweetheart, who died in 2009. In 1992 the Writers’ Guild of America awarded Pugh and Carroll its Paddy Chayefsky Laurel Award for Television Achievement. Pugh was LA Times “Woman of the Year”, 1957, and was recipient of the “Women in Film” award in 1996. In 2005, Pugh released her memoirs called Laughing with Lucy and included partner, Carroll, as a contributor of the book. Of ('I Love Lucy') enduring popularity, Pugh credits everyday situations they used to start each episode; 'we looked for common, everyday things that'happened to us or our families, or stories our friends'told us,'” posted this date in 2011.

 

April 22

 

Eddie Albert, of Green Acres fame; with Desi Arnaz, Screen Snapshots Series 23-1; “Hollywood in Uniform” 1943; Lucille Ball co-star, 1950; Westinghouse Desilu Playhouse, 1958; Desilu Productions’ The Greatest Show on Earth, 1963; Hollywood Without Makeup, with Lucille. via archival footage, 1963; (“Here’s Lucy”), 1973; CBS Salutes Lucy: The First 25 Years, 1976; guest, with Lucille, on Dean Martin’s Celebrity Roast: Jimmy Stewart, 1978; as well as appears with Lucille, NBC’s The First Academy of TV Arts and Sciences Television Hall of Fame, 1984, is born this date in 1906.

 

Hal March, Lucille Ball and Desi Arnaz’ family friend and supporting cast member, (“I Love Lucy”), 1952, 1953; Desilu Productions’ Willy 1954; Desilu Productions’ Here’s Hollywood 1962; The Lucy Show, 1966; and co-star with Lucille, A Guide for the Married Man 1967, is born this date in 1920.

 

Charlotte Lawrence, supporting cast member (“I Love Lucy”), 1953, 1955; and The Lucy Show, 1963, is born this date in 1921.

 

Aaron Spelling, Lucille Ball and Desi Arnaz’ friend of many years – the internationally respected producer and guest co-star (“I Love Lucy”), (launching Aaron’s amazing career), 1955; Desilu Productions’, Willy, 1954; Desilu Productions’, Westinghouse Desilu Playhouse, 1958; with Lucille, NBC: The Big Event: TV Guide, The First 25 Years, 1979, ultimately produces Lucille’s final series, Life With Lucy, using a fourth camera technique,1986; with Lucille, via archival footage, TV Guide’s 40th Anniversary 1998; as well as guest, The Desilu Story, 2003, is born this date in 1923.

 

Glen Campbell, of The Glen Campbell Goodtime Hour, on which Lucie Arnaz appears as guest, 1971; appears with Lucille Ball, Bob Hope's 30th Anniversary Special, 1981, and Bob Hope's High-Flying Birthday, 1986, is born this date in 1936.

 

Jack Nicholson, guest, Desilu Studios'-filmed, The Barbara Stanwyck Show, 1960; Desilu Productions', The Guns of Will Sonnett, 1967; appears with Lucille Ball, The American Film Institute Salute to Henry Fonda, 1978; as well as with Lucille Ball and Desi Arnaz, via archival footage, Junket Whore, 1998, is born this date in 1937.

 

Lucille Ball appears as Carol Meeley, in Fox Films' Go Chase Yourself, co-starring Jack Carson, Dick Lane; Joe Penner, and in uncredited roles; Chuck Hamilton, (character actor/stuntman), and Clayton Moore; during filming, Lucille becomes friends for life with Milton Berle, dating him several times, released this date in 1938.

 

Lucille Ball appears in Look Magazine this date in 1941.

 

Lucille Ball and co-star, Richard Denning, appear My Favorite Husband “Time Budgeting,” episode #41, produced and directed by Jess Oppenheimer; written by Jess Oppenheimer, Madelyn Pugh & Bob Carroll, Jr., featuring Ruth Perrott, as Katy the Maid, original music by Marlin Skiles; conducted by Wilbur Hatch; announcer, Bob LeMond, sponsored by General Foods, JELL-O; with veteran supporting cast member, Hans Conried, the basis for (“I Love Lucy”) #33 “Lucy’s Schedule”, airing this date in 1949.

(“I Love Lucy”) “The Sublease,” an guest co-starring the Mayer Twins, as Little Ricky, with guest co-star, Jay Novello, wherein the Ricardos sub-let their apartment, then Ricky’s booking is cancelled, is filmed this date in 1954.

 

(“I Love Lucy”) “The Country Club Dance” episode in which Barbara Eden co-stars, (Headliner - the Lucy-Desi Festival Days Memorial Day Weekend in Jamestown, NY, Lucille Ball’s hometown, May 29, 2005), in which the ‘girls’ get all dolled up to attend the dance; Keith Thibodeaux, as Little Ricky, with Ruth Brady, as Grace Munson, Tristram Coffin, Mary Jane Croft, Frank Nelson, , airing this date in 1957.

 

Variety: “Wildcat will close down for nine weeks, to allow Lucille Ball to rest up, and will resume August 7,” published this date in 1960.

 

Lucille Ball, after announcing in February Wildcat would temporarily shut down the production the last week in May, collapsed on stage during her second Saturday performance, this date in 1961.

 

The Lucy Show “Lucy and the Runaway Butterfly” - Phil Carey guest co-stars, with Lucy allowing a rare white butterfly to escape, and her efforts thereafter, airing this date in 1963.

 

Lucille Ball appears on NBC’s The Second Annual Television Academy Hall of Fame, honoring Carol Burnett, Sid Caesar, Walter Cronkite, and Ed Sullivan, among others, this date in 1985.

 

Lucille Ball posthumously receives the first “Legacy of Laughter” Award during the Fifth Annual TV Land Award Ceremony, presented to her children, Lucie Arnaz and Desi Arnaz IV, by Carol Burnett, close friend, and broadcast this date in 2007.

 

The Latest From Everything Lucy Website - “Lucy Author to Appear on Internet Radio Show – “Lucille Ball's career and her impact on television will be the topic on a special two part edition of Talking Television With Dave White, on April 22 and April 29 from 7:30-9 p.m. Pacific time (10:30-Midnight Eastern). Michael Karol, author of Lucy A to Z: The Lucille Ball Encyclopedia will be the special guest. The listening audience is invited to participate by phone (800)407-KSAV(5728) or via e-mail at talk@ksav.org. Talking Television is broadcast live, Tuesday evenings, on internet radio station KSAV www.ksav.org. First-time listeners should visit the website prior to the broadcast day and ensure the audio streams properly,” posted this date in 2008.

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For April 18th, Mr and Mrs, wasn't that special also written by Sherwood Scwartz of Brady Bunch and Gilligan's Island fame? Also for the sad entry about Lucy's heart attack, couldn't you add some humor that actually happened. Gary and Lucie both had to beg Lucy to go to the hospital and she insisted on putting on her make up before she finally left.

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Ok, April 16th, Henry Mancini, what does he have to do with Viv Vance?

 

I agree - cumbersome - has been changed to read:

 

Henry Mancini, Composer; appears with Lucille Ball, via archival footage, That's Dancing! 1985; Composer of original music, The Great Race, starring, among others, Vivian Vance (Lucy's Ethel Mertz), 1965, is born this date in 1924.

 

 

Thanks for bringing it to my attention pre-editing procedures....Love, JK

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For April 18th, Mr and Mrs, wasn't that special also written by Sherwood Scwartz of Brady Bunch and Gilligan's Island fame? Also for the sad entry about Lucy's heart attack, couldn't you add some humor that actually happened. Gary and Lucie both had to beg Lucy to go to the hospital and she insisted on putting on her make up before she finally left.

 

Have to do a little research on this one....

 

How do we know, for instance, that Lucie and Gary begged her to go to hospital? And, the part of the make-up.... thanks, if you know...

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Typo, you stated Lucy appeared on the 62st Academy awards with Ryan O'Neal, it was actually the 61nd, LOL! Also on the 19th, you list Jess as the writer of Mr and Mrs which he was, but, it was an original story from the aforementionned Sherwood Schwartz.

 

Thanks, again, Claude, for calling this one to my attention; I'll get to it....soon. Love, JK

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Have to do a little research on this one....

 

How do we know, for instance, that Lucie and Gary begged her to go to hospital? And, the part of the make-up.... thanks, if you know...

It's in the books courtesy of Lucie and gary who should know, they were there. Gary was crying, pleading with her to go, she did not want to, knowing this was very serious, Lucie came down in a rush from her own house and started begging her also. But Lucy would not leave till she at least fixed herself up a bit first.

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You sure must have BIG ONES coming for next week as it commemorates the DEATH of Lucy.

 

We shall see what we shall see!

 

In the meantime, I have added what follows, to the 20th [and will add it on the appropriate day]:

 

The Post-Journal, Readers' Forum - Time to Mark Lucy's Birthplace - “To the Readers' Forum, C. Ralph Heeter - When one looks around the City of Jamestown, you will see many historical markers noting anything from neighborhood sites, office sites and armory locations to historical figures like Reuben Fenton; but, one of Jamestown's most-famous-internationally-known figures, Lucille Ball, was born here and there is no historical marker for her birthplace. From the book Love, Lucy, by Lucille Ball, with Betty Hannah Hoffman, on page 4, are the words: 'but I was born in my grandparents' apartment on Stewart Street, Jamestown, NY, where I was delivered by my Grandmother, Flora Belle Hunt.' From a web site reflecting another autobiographical account, she specifically stated that her grandmother lived at 123 Stewart. ...but a quick check of Stewart Avenue shows no house number that reaches anywhere near 123, and there is no plaque anywhere on the street to indicate the location... Looking at a map of the City of Jamestown for 1911 ... Stewart Street is lined out at each of two streets. The City Directory for 1911 shows that Fred C. Hunt, family of 5, lived at 123 Stewart Avenue, in one of three apartments existing at that location. The final solution to Lucille Ball's birthplace came when the two-year street directories for 1913-4 and 1915-6 were viewed, showing a numbering change. Although none of the residents remained over the two-year period publication, the next neighbors at 115 and 117 did remain, revealing their new numbers at 57 and 59, while 123, the next house up from 117, became 69; leaving no question about 69 Stewart Avenue as being the birthplace of Lucille Ball. It would be nice if a historical marker plaque could be processed and located this year in time for Lucille's 100th Birthday Celebration,” published this date in 2011.

*******

 

Thanks for your constant 'fanism' - is that a word? If not, should be!

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Have added to the 20th:

 

The Post-Journal, Readers' Forum - Time to Mark Lucy's Birthplace - “To the Readers' Forum, C. Ralph Heeter - When one looks around the City of Jamestown, you will see many historical markers noting anything from neighborhood sites, office sites and armory locations to historical figures like Reuben Fenton; but, one of Jamestown's most-famous-internationally-known figures, Lucille Ball, was born here and there is no historical marker for her birthplace. From the book Love, Lucy, by Lucille Ball, with Betty Hannah Hoffman, on page 4, are the words: 'but I was born in my grandparents' apartment on Stewart Street, Jamestown, NY, where I was delivered by my Grandmother, Flora Belle Hunt.' From a web site reflecting another autobiographical account, she specifically stated that her grandmother lived at 123 Stewart. ...but a quick check of Stewart Avenue shows no house number that reaches anywhere near 123, and there is no plaque anywhere on the street to indicate the location... Looking at a map of the City of Jamestown for 1911 ... Stewart Street is lined out at each of two streets. The City Directory for 1911 shows that Fred C. Hunt, family of 5, lived at 123 Stewart Avenue, in one of three apartments existing at that location. The final solution to Lucille Ball's birthplace came when the two-year street directories for 1913-4 and 1915-6 were viewed, showing a numbering change. Although none of the residents remained over the two-year period publication, the next neighbors at 115 and 117 did remain, revealing their new numbers at 57 and 59, while 123, the next house up from 117, became 69; leaving no question about 69 Stewart Avenue as being the birthplace of Lucille Ball. It would be nice if a historical marker plaque could be processed and located this year in time for Lucille's 100th Birthday Celebration,” published this date in 2011.

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