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Janet Waldo talks about working on ILL and TLS


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Here is a great new interview from TVSeriesFinale.com with Janet Waldo in which she talks about working on I Love Lucy and The Lucy Show:

_________________________________________________________________________

 

I Love Lucy: Voiceover Legend Janet Waldo Recalls Lucy and Desi

 

 

You may not know her name but you certainly know her voice. Janet Waldo has been acting professionally for more than 70 years. Discovered by Bing Crosby, she worked on many radio shows and starred for eight years as teenager Corliss Archer on Meet Corliss Archer. She went on to become a staple of many classic Hanna-Barbera cartoons as the voice of Judy Jetson (The Jetsons), Nancy (Shazzan), Granny Sweet (The Atom Ant/Secret Squirrel Show), Josie McCoy (Josie and the Pussycats, Josie and the Pussycats in Outer Space), Penelope Pitstop (Wacky Races, The Perils of Penelope Pitstop), and Morticia Addams (The Addams Family).

 

At age 87, Waldo is just as energetic as ever and her voices sounds virtually the same. I spoke to her about The Jetsons and the release of the 1988 TV movie called Rocking with Judy Jetson. But first, I had to ask Waldo about one of her first on-camera roles.

 

Of course, you’re most known for your large volume of voiceover roles but I have to ask you about your work on I Love Lucy.

Janet Waldo: Oh, I’m delighted to talk about that.

 

Now, you were in the 20th episode that aired in January 1952 and it was called “The Young Fans.” As I recall, you were playing a teenager who’s infatuated with Ricky Ricardo (Desi Arnaz) and Lucy tries to pair you up with a teenage boy who in turn falls for her. What do you remember about working with Lucy and Desi?

Waldo: I have lots of memories because Lucy herself was quite a character and a fascinating personality. I think it was the first TV show that I’d ever done. I’m not sure but, anyway, Dick Crenna was also on and he played the boyfriend who was in love with her and I was in love with Ricky. And Lucy was quite fascinating. Would you like me to tell you a little about Lucy?

 

Absolutely, please.

Waldo: Well, she was amazing. I still watch her shows. They’re still on TV and they’re fantastic and I see that one that I did very frequently. But, she was very low-key until the lights came on and the cameras were turned on and then she lit up, like a star. She was just brilliant. And very funny and very nice to me and nice to work with.

 

I remember I was plenty scared because it was the first time I had done anything like that and I was studying my script right before we went on. Because we did it live in front of an audience so we had no pickups. And she said to me, “It’s too late now!” (laughs) She was very sweet to me but very real and it was great fun to do and Desi was charming and delightful and wonderful and I loved it. I love it every time I see it repeated. I think it’s very funny.

 

Do you remember anything about Vivian Vance and William Frawley?

Waldo: Well, they weren’t on that show. On the one episode that I did but, on The Lucy Show, I played Lucy’s sister and Vivian Vance was on that one.

 

Right, now that was about 11 years later in an episode called “Lucy’s Sister Pays a Visit.” What was that experience like?

Waldo: I was a great fan of Lucy and all her shows and I played her sister. And I had to cry and the director kept saying, “Do it again. Do it again.” And I’d do it again and I’d say to Lucy, “I don’t know what he wants from me.” And she’d say, “He wants you to bawl like me!” (laughs). So I was afraid to do that because I didn’t want to imitate her but I imitated Lucy’s bawl and that’s exactly what he wanted. She was absolutely right. And he printed.

 

I see. You were playing her sister so they share a similar way of crying…

Waldo: Yes, of course but you know, in this profession, you don’t want to steal from anybody else. But I did and that’s what he wanted. (laughs) And, I did it with her blessing.

 

Did you notice a difference in Lucy since you’d worked with her more than 10 years earlier?

Waldo: Between the two shows? Yes, she was much warmer with the first one. But, it was hard for Lucy to be warm, she was a very, um, cool person. She didn’t do… chatter, you know. She was very private and the only thing was that, on the second one, that she was away from Desi and she was a totally different person. She was so obviously very unhappy and angry and it was a whole different show. But the first one was a complete joy.

 

And Peter Marshall (Hollywood Squares) played your husband…

Waldo: And he was so unhappy when we did that show together that, before we went on in front of the live audience, he threw up (laughs). He was so… I don’t think he’d like for me to tell this story but he went off and got sick to his stomach. But he was angry and not happy at that point either. So it was all just a very different experience for me. But, I Love Lucy was such fun. I can’t begin to describe it. And Desi was wonderful and, actually, can I tell you something about him?

 

By all means!

Waldo: This is a story that people ask me about who are writing books and I’ve stopped telling about it because they want to make something of it. But Desi, you know I think he was very much in love with Lucy but I think that they had their problems. So anyway, he asked me to come to his dressing room. And I thought “Oh, he’s going to give me some pointers” (laughs). And I was pretty naive in those years (laughs). Because naturally I wanted to improve as much as I possibly could so I went to his dressing room with him and he closed the door. And I thought, “Oh, now he’s going to tell me how I can improve this.”

 

Two seconds later, the door opened and it was Lucy. And she was very angry and upset that I was in the room so I quickly excused myself and left. But, everybody that I talk to about that wants me to make something of it. But he was a perfect gentleman. He was very sweet to me. And I only bring it up because people realize that he had the wanderlust and I didn’t, I was just naive. But, he was just a perfectly sweet man.

 

That’s a great story.

Waldo: And you know, in the scene where they make themselves up to look older and he’s in a wheelchair and his legs are poised up on another chair, and he asks me to jiggle his legs. And he said, “Keep jiggling, Peggy, keep jiggling!” And now, when I go to sign autographs or when I see anybody who remembers that Lucy episode, they always say, “Keep jiggling, Peggy, keep jiggling!” (laughs).

 

SOURCE: http://tvseriesfinale.com/tv-show/i-love-lucy-janet-waldo-20558/

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Here is a great new interview from TVSeriesFinale.com with Janet Waldo in which she talks about working on I Love Lucy and The Lucy Show:

_________________________________________________________________________

 

I Love Lucy: Voiceover Legend Janet Waldo Recalls Lucy and Desi

 

 

You may not know her name but you certainly know her voice. Janet Waldo has been acting professionally for more than 70 years. Discovered by Bing Crosby, she worked on many radio shows and starred for eight years as teenager Corliss Archer on Meet Corliss Archer. She went on to become a staple of many classic Hanna-Barbera cartoons as the voice of Judy Jetson (The Jetsons), Nancy (Shazzan), Granny Sweet (The Atom Ant/Secret Squirrel Show), Josie McCoy (Josie and the Pussycats, Josie and the Pussycats in Outer Space), Penelope Pitstop (Wacky Races, The Perils of Penelope Pitstop), and Morticia Addams (The Addams Family).

 

At age 87, Waldo is just as energetic as ever and her voices sounds virtually the same. I spoke to her about The Jetsons and the release of the 1988 TV movie called Rocking with Judy Jetson. But first, I had to ask Waldo about one of her first on-camera roles.

 

Of course, you’re most known for your large volume of voiceover roles but I have to ask you about your work on I Love Lucy.

Janet Waldo: Oh, I’m delighted to talk about that.

 

Now, you were in the 20th episode that aired in January 1952 and it was called “The Young Fans.” As I recall, you were playing a teenager who’s infatuated with Ricky Ricardo (Desi Arnaz) and Lucy tries to pair you up with a teenage boy who in turn falls for her. What do you remember about working with Lucy and Desi?

Waldo: I have lots of memories because Lucy herself was quite a character and a fascinating personality. I think it was the first TV show that I’d ever done. I’m not sure but, anyway, Dick Crenna was also on and he played the boyfriend who was in love with her and I was in love with Ricky. And Lucy was quite fascinating. Would you like me to tell you a little about Lucy?

 

Absolutely, please.

Waldo: Well, she was amazing. I still watch her shows. They’re still on TV and they’re fantastic and I see that one that I did very frequently. But, she was very low-key until the lights came on and the cameras were turned on and then she lit up, like a star. She was just brilliant. And very funny and very nice to me and nice to work with.

 

I remember I was plenty scared because it was the first time I had done anything like that and I was studying my script right before we went on. Because we did it live in front of an audience so we had no pickups. And she said to me, “It’s too late now!” (laughs) She was very sweet to me but very real and it was great fun to do and Desi was charming and delightful and wonderful and I loved it. I love it every time I see it repeated. I think it’s very funny.

 

Do you remember anything about Vivian Vance and William Frawley?

Waldo: Well, they weren’t on that show. On the one episode that I did but, on The Lucy Show, I played Lucy’s sister and Vivian Vance was on that one.

 

Right, now that was about 11 years later in an episode called “Lucy’s Sister Pays a Visit.” What was that experience like?

Waldo: I was a great fan of Lucy and all her shows and I played her sister. And I had to cry and the director kept saying, “Do it again. Do it again.” And I’d do it again and I’d say to Lucy, “I don’t know what he wants from me.” And she’d say, “He wants you to bawl like me!” (laughs). So I was afraid to do that because I didn’t want to imitate her but I imitated Lucy’s bawl and that’s exactly what he wanted. She was absolutely right. And he printed.

 

I see. You were playing her sister so they share a similar way of crying…

Waldo: Yes, of course but you know, in this profession, you don’t want to steal from anybody else. But I did and that’s what he wanted. (laughs) And, I did it with her blessing.

 

Did you notice a difference in Lucy since you’d worked with her more than 10 years earlier?

Waldo: Between the two shows? Yes, she was much warmer with the first one. But, it was hard for Lucy to be warm, she was a very, um, cool person. She didn’t do… chatter, you know. She was very private and the only thing was that, on the second one, that she was away from Desi and she was a totally different person. She was so obviously very unhappy and angry and it was a whole different show. But the first one was a complete joy.

 

And Peter Marshall (Hollywood Squares) played your husband…

Waldo: And he was so unhappy when we did that show together that, before we went on in front of the live audience, he threw up (laughs). He was so… I don’t think he’d like for me to tell this story but he went off and got sick to his stomach. But he was angry and not happy at that point either. So it was all just a very different experience for me. But, I Love Lucy was such fun. I can’t begin to describe it. And Desi was wonderful and, actually, can I tell you something about him?

 

By all means!

Waldo: This is a story that people ask me about who are writing books and I’ve stopped telling about it because they want to make something of it. But Desi, you know I think he was very much in love with Lucy but I think that they had their problems. So anyway, he asked me to come to his dressing room. And I thought “Oh, he’s going to give me some pointers” (laughs). And I was pretty naive in those years (laughs). Because naturally I wanted to improve as much as I possibly could so I went to his dressing room with him and he closed the door. And I thought, “Oh, now he’s going to tell me how I can improve this.”

 

Two seconds later, the door opened and it was Lucy. And she was very angry and upset that I was in the room so I quickly excused myself and left. But, everybody that I talk to about that wants me to make something of it. But he was a perfect gentleman. He was very sweet to me. And I only bring it up because people realize that he had the wanderlust and I didn’t, I was just naive. But, he was just a perfectly sweet man.

 

That’s a great story.

Waldo: And you know, in the scene where they make themselves up to look older and he’s in a wheelchair and his legs are poised up on another chair, and he asks me to jiggle his legs. And he said, “Keep jiggling, Peggy, keep jiggling!” And now, when I go to sign autographs or when I see anybody who remembers that Lucy episode, they always say, “Keep jiggling, Peggy, keep jiggling!” (laughs).

 

SOURCE: http://tvseriesfinale.com/tv-show/i-love-lucy-janet-waldo-20558/

What an absolutely terrific interview. She could have added that the asshole peter marshall was also nervous about his family as the Cuban Missile crisis was going on when they filmed that particular Lucy show. So all of them were on edge and worried about more important things than getting a tv show in the can.

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  • 1 year later...

There is a lovely 1938 portrait of an allegedly 14-year-old Janet Waldo on eBay right now.

 

AGN-711-BS_F.JPG

 

http://www.ebay.com/itm/BS-PHOTO-agn-711-Janet-Waldo-Actress-1938-/281008571549?pt=Art_Photo_Images&hash=item416d6a849d

 

And another:

 

AGN-719-BS_F.JPG

 

And one more. Too bad we can't blow it up to see what date was on her billfold. :lucythrill:

 

AGN-713-BS_F.JPG

Beautiful, just beautiful, dontcha have anything recent of her?

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Here's a fun video of her taken less than two years ago, still youthful as ever:

 

janet got her picture

 

And doing her Judy Jetson voice on the same occasion:

 

Thank You

OMG, she looks sensational, doesn't look her age at all. And i certainly know how popular the woman is, i believe there's a whole series of books asking about her, i think they're called WHERE'S WALDO? I've seen them at my local Nanette Fibrary.

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Believe it or not I have known who Janet Waldo was for about as long as I have known of Lucy. THE JETSONS and THE PERILS OF PENELOPE PITSTOP were a big part of my childhood and I always read the credits for voice actors.

 

I believe Janet when she says she was born in 1924 and not 1917, for one thing she looks absolutely amazing for 88, it would seem inconceivable anyone could look like that at 95! The studios apparently had quite a few teenaged starlets who had to fudge about their ages to get signed, Ann Miller being the most famous case but also Jane Wyman and Rita Hayworth. All of them during the same period too although Rita was a few years earlier.

 

There's another Lucy/Janet connection - Janet's husband was playwright Robert E. Lee who co-wrote the book for MAME.

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Believe it or not I have known who Janet Waldo was for about as long as I have known of Lucy. THE JETSONS and THE PERILS OF PENELOPE PITSTOP were a big part of my childhood and I always read the credits for voice actors.

 

I believe Janet when she says she was born in 1924 and not 1917, for one thing she looks absolutely amazing for 88, it would seem inconceivable anyone could look like that at 95! The studios apparently had quite a few teenaged starlets who had to fudge about their ages to get signed, Ann Miller being the most famous case but also Jane Wyman and Rita Hayworth. All of them during the same period too although Rita was a few years earlier.

 

There's another Lucy/Janet connection - Janet's husband was playwright Robert E. Lee who co-wrote the book for MAME.

 

The only thing that makes me doubt Janet saying her birthday is 1924 is that a Janet Waldo matching her family information appears in the 1920 US Census. Either she was indeed born in 1918, the census taker was clairvoyant, or perhaps she was named in honour of an elder sister who died at an early age. Hmmm... She looks great and seems so youthful regardless of whether she is 88 or nearly 95. Good on her!

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The only thing that makes me doubt Janet saying her birthday is 1924 is that a Janet Waldo matching her family information appears in the 1920 US Census. Either she was indeed born in 1918, the census taker was clairvoyant, or perhaps she was named in honour of an elder sister who died at an early age. Hmmm... She looks great and seems so youthful regardless of whether she is 88 or nearly 95. Good on her!

I don't think she has ever actually stated her age anywhere or said she was born in 1924 - or 1918 - it's just that the 1918 date appears to have been used in the 1940's and the 1924 date used in publicity more recent decades. I just presumed the 1924 might be accurate given how many teenaged starlets there were in the 1930's but if she's indeed 94 wow, she's even more amazing !!

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Believe it or not I have known who Janet Waldo was for about as long as I have known of Lucy. THE JETSONS and THE PERILS OF PENELOPE PITSTOP were a big part of my childhood and I always read the credits for voice actors.

 

I believe Janet when she says she was born in 1924 and not 1917, for one thing she looks absolutely amazing for 88, it would seem inconceivable anyone could look like that at 95! The studios apparently had quite a few teenaged starlets who had to fudge about their ages to get signed, Ann Miller being the most famous case but also Jane Wyman and Rita Hayworth. All of them during the same period too although Rita was a few years earlier.

 

There's another Lucy/Janet connection - Janet's husband was playwright Robert E. Lee who co-wrote the book for MAME.

Well MOTHER OF JEFFERSON DAVIS, then she MUST be older than the age stated as Robert E Lee dates back to the civil war, dun't he?

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I don't think she has ever actually stated her age anywhere or said she was born in 1924 - or 1918 - it's just that the 1918 date appears to have been used in the 1940's and the 1924 date used in publicity more recent decades. I just presumed the 1924 might be accurate given how many teenaged starlets there were in the 1930's but if she's indeed 94 wow, she's even more amazing !!

 

Let's try this logically, if not census-ly; Lucille, when that episode was filmed, was just over 40; Janet, just past 34 (28, if born in 24); she was pregnant, at either 'age'; both, obviously, did not look their age; IMDb, though not perfect, says 1918, making her a mere 7 years less Lucille's age. Now, where were we????

 

Do we have ANY idea when that 'recent' video was taken? I'll bet showing her in a close-up like we had of Marjorie Lord would reveal wonders, unless, of course, she has had some 'work' done.

 

Doesn't really matter; she looks good, and is still alive; guess that's what really matters. JK

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Let's try this logically, if not census-ly; Lucille, when that episode was filmed, was just over 40; Janet, just past 34 (28, if born in 24); she was pregnant, at either 'age'; both, obviously, did not look their age; IMDb, though not perfect, says 1918, making her a mere 7 years less Lucille's age. Now, where were we????

 

Do we have ANY idea when that 'recent' video was taken? I'll bet showing her in a close-up like we had of Marjorie Lord would reveal wonders, unless, of course, she has had some 'work' done.

 

Doesn't really matter; she looks good, and is still alive; guess that's what really matters. JK

Then again, if you DID show her in a close up like Marjorie's, SHE COULD SUE THE PANTS OFF YA! :lucydisgust::lucythrill:

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Precisely November 11, 2010.

 

Still not sure what you two think is so bad about that Marjorie picture. SHe looks incredible for 94.

 

 

And............I REPEAT..........a woman's vanity is something you can't know about....ask your Mom - she looks great; but, she can explain to you in clear language, why close-ups of a woman are taboo; especially, for stars. Show her the photo of Marjorie and get HER reaction... Let me know what it is.... We'll go by HER impression.

 

Loving you, JK

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Oh i AM, i AM, hasn't he become so sexy in his old age? He used to be this unapealing kiddie but man, has he ever blossomed with this new rougher image? Sorry, this conversation belongs on OUR other thread, LOL!

Yup, over the hill at 25! But when in your opinion was he ever unappealing??! I missed that "period"! lucythrill.JPG

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And............I REPEAT..........a woman's vanity is something you can't know about....ask your Mom - she looks great; but, she can explain to you in clear language, why close-ups of a woman are taboo; especially, for stars. Show her the photo of Marjorie and get HER reaction... Let me know what it is.... We'll go by HER impression.

 

Loving you, JK

It's like these idiot photographers do it on purpose, they love to get up there into their noses, so stupid.

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