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Legendary songwriter Robert Sherman has died


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Legendary songwriter Robert Sherman, who famously teamed with his brother Richard to pen some of the most memorable movie songs of all time, has died at 86. It's the end of a brilliant, sad, but ultimately completely fascinating partnership which brought so many musical gifts to the world. :(

 

FROM THE CBC:

 

Songwriter Robert B. Sherman, who co-wrote memorable songs in films such as Mary Poppins and The Jungle Book, as well as the ubiquitous Disney tune It's a Small World (After All), has died.

 

Sherman died peacefully in London on Monday at the age of 86, his agent Stella Richards confirmed on Tuesday.

 

The songwriter's son, Jeffrey, revealed the news via Facebook and wrote that his father "wanted to bring happiness to the world and, unquestionably, he succeeded.

 

"Forever his songs and his genius will bring hope, joy and love to this small, small world."

 

Robert Sherman and his younger brother Richard were the sons of Rosa and Al Sherman, who was a successful composer on New York's Tin Pan Alley. Together, the brothers became an award-winning songwriting duo who created wrote more than 150 songs for Walt Disney films.

 

In addition to songs for Mary Poppins, The Jungle Book and Chitty Chitty Bang Bang, the prolific pair also wrote the musical scores for such films as:

 

The Sword and the Stone

The Parent Trap

Bedknobs and Broomsticks

The Aristocats

Charlotte's Web

Tom Sawyer

Huckleberry Finn

The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh

Snoopy, Come Home

The Tigger Movie

 

The duo's catchy, family-friendly tunes earned them a raft of honours, including gold and platinum albums, two Academy Awards, a Grammy, a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame and entry into the U.S. Songwriters Hall of Fame.

 

When former U.S. president George W. Bush awarded the brothers the National Medal of Arts in 2008, he hailed them for creating music that "helped bring joy to millions."

War hero-turned-songwriter

 

Sherman grew up in New York and Beverly Hills, Calif. In 1943, at the age of 17, he joined the army and was stationed in Europe during the Second World War. He eventually received multiple honours for his military service, including a Purple Heart medal.

 

After the war, he returned to New York to study English literature and painting. During this time, he also began writing novels. Not long after, however, he and his brother began writing songs after their father challenged them to give it a try.

 

"Being brothers, we sort of short-cut each other," Richard Sherman once said in an interview. "We can almost look at each other and know, 'Hey, you're onto something, kiddo.'"

 

In the early 1950s, Sherman also married Joyce Sasner and the couple began their family.

 

The first Sherman Brothers Top 10 hit arrived a few years later: Tall Paul, sung by Annette Funicello in 1958. The successful track for the former Mousketeer helped draw the attention of Disney executives and led to the Sherman Brothers being hired as staff songwriters for Walt Disney Studios.

 

It's a Small World (After All), which the pair wrote for the 1964 World's Fair in New York could be considered their most enduring composition. It is one of the most translated and performed songs on the planet since it plays on a continual loop at Disney theme parks worldwide.

 

"We've driven teenagers crazy in every language," Sherman quipped in a past interview.

 

Aside from their film work, the brothers also penned the Tony-nominated musical Over Here! and hit songs like You're Sixteen and Let's Get Together.

 

Though they suffered a period of estrangement, the brothers reunited to work together in recent years, including writing new lyrics and songs for the 2005 Broadway production of Chitty Chitty Bang Bang.

 

Sherman spent his final years in London, where in addition to penning songs, he spent time writing and painting. He is survived by his two daughters and two sons.

With files from The Associated Press

 

SOURCE: http://www.cbc.ca/news/arts/story/2012/03/06/obit-sherman-robert-songwriter-disney.html

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My favorite Mary Poppins song: "Sister Suffragette" as sung by Glynis Johns, made shortly after her aborted Desilu "Glynis" series--backed up by Hermoine Baddley and Reta Shaw. "Our daughter's daughters will adore us. And they'll sing in grateful chorus: Well, done! sister Suffragette!" 2nd favorite "the Life I lead" "At 6:01, I march through the door. My slippers, sherry and pipe are due...at 6:02. How pleasant is the life I lead"

 

I'm surprised one of their most unusual accomplishments wasn't mention: the Broadway score to the surprise hit of 1975 (or so) "Over Here" starring 2/3rds of the Andrews Sisters....Laverne had died and for the third sister I guess Patty went to the Unique Employment Agency but instead of Lucy, got Janie Sell...It's really their best work: a very overlooked and underrated score: songs that sound like they came right out of the big band era, without being derivative on any particular tune, including several with classic Andrews sisters harmony. Also in the cast: John Travolta, pre-stardom who had a solo. Supposedly after the ovations, Patty and Maxine would tear down the house with a medley of their hits (LIVE because you know what happened to the records they were going to lip-sync to...) I don't know that either of the sisters worked much after that, but for "Over Here" they rose to the occasion. I read somewhere they had a big falling out. Maxine died but as far as I know, Patty is still alive.

"Over Here" has not had a revival, although I think it could be done. The plot is very thin, but the music is toe-tappin'!

 

Thank you Shermans! I spent a lot of time listening to your music.

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"Over Here" has not had a revival, although I think it could be done. The plot is very thin, but the music is toe-tappin'!

 

Two years ago, there was a revival of Over Here! announced for a run in LA before moving to Broadway. Donna McKecknie and Pam Myers were announced to star alongside Dick Van Dyke. There was a website set up with information about the revival, but I haven't hear a word about it since then.

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Two years ago, there was a revival of Over Here! announced for a run in LA before moving to Broadway. Donna McKecknie and Pam Myers were announced to star alongside Dick Van Dyke. There was a website set up with information about the revival, but I haven't hear a word about it since then.

 

Dick Van Dyke?? I don't recall a prominent male role or even a showy supporting one. It's not possible he was the third in the singing trio, is it?

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Doing some more research, it was reported that the revival was cancelled because Dick dropped out at the last minute when his partner Michelle was diagnosed with terminal cancer. This can't be true because I'm positive the revival was announced (with Dick's involvement) several weeks after Michelle died. Supposedly, the revival is still in the works.

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My favorite Mary Poppins song: "Sister Suffragette" as sung by Glynis Johns, made shortly after her aborted Desilu "Glynis" series--backed up by Hermoine Baddley and Reta Shaw. "Our daughter's daughters will adore us. And they'll sing in grateful chorus: Well, done! sister Suffragette!" 2nd favorite "the Life I lead" "At 6:01, I march through the door. My slippers, sherry and pipe are due...at 6:02. How pleasant is the life I lead"

 

Oddly enough, those are probably my two of my favourite songs from the movie as well, rounding out the top five along with I Love To Laugh and Spoonful of Sugar.

 

Thanks to you both for the Over There! info. I think a YouTube excavation is in order.

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Oddly enough, those are probably my two of my favourite songs from the movie as well, rounding out the top five along with I Love To Laugh and Spoonful of Sugar.

 

Thanks to you both for the Over There! info. I think a YouTube excavation is in order.

Are these the same Sherman brothers who had that documentary about them a while back that you were telling us about but i never got around to watching although i did record it?

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