Jump to content

Shirley Hemphill


Recommended Posts

http://www.freshyarn.com/9/printer_ready/print_negron_pink.htm

 

The only problem with the chronology of this article is that in 1977, "What's Happening!!" had already been running. I read a different version of this somewhere that does not name Shirley but it's clear it's her. In this version, Shirley would precede every question with some credit or where she was appearing. Poor Shirley: I think was just trying to be funny, but La Ball was having none of it. Shirley Hemphill made the most of what little gifts she had. I'm sure the bravado hid an insecure person, considering she was hopelessly homely and unappealing in a town that places so much value on looks. Never a fan of hers or "what's Happening!!" but I did feel a little sorry for her when I read this, being torn apart by someone she most likely looked up to. She was after all in a hit series but should be given credit for still wanting to learn from the master.

 

I've never gotten the impression that Lucy actually enjoyed these seminars/workshops/classes. At the same time, there were a lot of older stars who toured with "An Evening with....". Old movie clips would be shown and the star would emerge to thunderous applause to take questions. These stars reveled in the adulation and left the audience satisfied that the star enjoyed the work as much as the audience had.

Lucy, on the other hand, seemed annoyed and almost hostile to fans thrilled to meet her ("Why the hell would you want to know that?"), ridiculing them when they were proud of themselves for memorizing a line of scene in those pre-DVD days, belittling them with "Get a life"-type responses. The audience tried to go along with her, laughing at the outrageous nature of her tone, as if she were doing Don Rickles, but I'm sure there was a bit of disappointment that this woman we all loved so much and that brought us so much enjoyment seemed unhappy. My comment, by the way, is based on listening to a recording of one seminar and the America Alive video.

But post-1974 was not an easy time for Lucy. After being employed steadily for 40 years, she was suddenly idle, no longer in demand in the way she wanted to be, probably very hard for woman as vibrant as she, who had only a few years previous been a major player calling the shots in a way that few woman up to that time were able to. As those of us who are little older than the average person on this board knows, the speed that time whizzing by gains momentum and it's all so out of control. We get old and don't even realize it's happening. That' bad enough for us regular folk but when you have 20 year old images of yourself viewed daily, it's nearly impossible to live up to that. Lucy was all of a sudden being appreciated for her past, not her present. However she fared better than all of her contemporaries (with the possible exception of Hepburn) because at least the public tuned in for whatever she gave them, though the reaction was more often than not, disappointing. No one was asking Ginger Rogers to do a series; Bette Davis to do an "A" movie. And think how many of Lucy's contemporaries were considered for the film "Mame"...None, though they were still able and MORE than willing.

There's a great quote in the book TV Sirens about Lucy in 1984: "Lucy is not so much at the end of the line as she is in a catch-22. She can't exactly do her style of comedy anymore and can't really do drama." I disagree a bit. She could still do her style of comedy, just not the same way as when she pranced around in black and white. And she COULD do drama. It's just not what the public wanted out of her.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 year later...

Wow ..can't believe I took so long to read this . Very interesting. Kinda leaves you wondering why she did.thse seminars in the first place and also on a level it.saddens me she allowed herself to come across so brusque. Certainly she was aware of what.her fans or those curious somewhat expected... I can see her eventually.becoming stern but to be that way from the.beginning is a bit of a shock. Of course this may well have been her demeanor all along and we were never privy to it. It doesnt shock me now, but there was a.time in my LUCY.worshiping.past when it would.have. I remember how stunned I was when I realized the ACTRESS was nothing like the.CHARACTER she played.

Neil, do u know what her motives for.doing these seminars were? Does anybody?

I enjoyed this article you posted. Thank you

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I dreaded coming here when I read the title of this thread, such sad memories. Yes, that was supposedly the reason Desi never wanted her to do talk shows, so that people wouldn't see the way she really was, totally unlike her character although she did put on a good show at the end of her life, seemingly mellowed, knowing the end was near anyway. Lucy did the seminars as people suggested she should at least give her something to look forward to as she was bored to death staying home playing games. And I keep saying this but La Davis and Hepburn were exactly the same way as she was, frosty, direct, no nonsense type ladies who had seen it all, done it all and had no time for crap of any kind. That clip of NBC's Jane Pauley was a perfect example, she's fawning over Lucy saying HOW BEAUTIFUL SHE WAS and Lucy cuts her off, no fake praise for Lucy, and says IT'S MY STORY AND I'M GONNA TELL IT. And they showed us this clip in her obit on NBC too. Maybe part of Lucy thought, if only these people that worship the ground I walk on knew the real me, they wouldn't be so effusive with their praise. And imagine hearing this sort of thing every hour of every day for decades and see how you'd react.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

http://www.freshyarn...negron_pink.htm

 

The only problem with the chronology of this article is that in 1977, "What's Happening!!" had already been running. I read a different version of this somewhere that does not name Shirley but it's clear it's her. In this version, Shirley would precede every question with some credit or where she was appearing. Poor Shirley: I think was just trying to be funny, but La Ball was having none of it. Shirley Hemphill made the most of what little gifts she had. I'm sure the bravado hid an insecure person, considering she was hopelessly homely and unappealing in a town that places so much value on looks. Never a fan of hers or "what's Happening!!" but I did feel a little sorry for her when I read this, being torn apart by someone she most likely looked up to. She was after all in a hit series but should be given credit for still wanting to learn from the master.

 

I've never gotten the impression that Lucy actually enjoyed these seminars/workshops/classes. At the same time, there were a lot of older stars who toured with "An Evening with....". Old movie clips would be shown and the star would emerge to thunderous applause to take questions. These stars reveled in the adulation and left the audience satisfied that the star enjoyed the work as much as the audience had.

Lucy, on the other hand, seemed annoyed and almost hostile to fans thrilled to meet her ("Why the hell would you want to know that?"), ridiculing them when they were proud of themselves for memorizing a line of scene in those pre-DVD days, belittling them with "Get a life"-type responses. The audience tried to go along with her, laughing at the outrageous nature of her tone, as if she were doing Don Rickles, but I'm sure there was a bit of disappointment that this woman we all loved so much and that brought us so much enjoyment seemed unhappy. My comment, by the way, is based on listening to a recording of one seminar and the America Alive video.

But post-1974 was not an easy time for Lucy. After being employed steadily for 40 years, she was suddenly idle, no longer in demand in the way she wanted to be, probably very hard for woman as vibrant as she, who had only a few years previous been a major player calling the shots in a way that few woman up to that time were able to. As those of us who are little older than the average person on this board knows, the speed that time whizzing by gains momentum and it's all so out of control. We get old and don't even realize it's happening. That' bad enough for us regular folk but when you have 20 year old images of yourself viewed daily, it's nearly impossible to live up to that. Lucy was all of a sudden being appreciated for her past, not her present. However she fared better than all of her contemporaries (with the possible exception of Hepburn) because at least the public tuned in for whatever she gave them, though the reaction was more often than not, disappointing. No one was asking Ginger Rogers to do a series; Bette Davis to do an "A" movie. And think how many of Lucy's contemporaries were considered for the film "Mame"...None, though they were still able and MORE than willing.

There's a great quote in the book TV Sirens about Lucy in 1984: "Lucy is not so much at the end of the line as she is in a catch-22. She can't exactly do her style of comedy anymore and can't really do drama." I disagree a bit. She could still do her style of comedy, just not the same way as when she pranced around in black and white. And she COULD do drama. It's just not what the public wanted out of her.

 

Jim Brochu tells the Shirley Hemphill saga in his book written in 1990 and it's much different, although he doesn't mention her by name. I think he wrote (I don't know where the book is at the moment) that Shirley prefaced her questions to Lucy bragging on her own credits every time and Lucy eventually shot her down with a response. And while it's a possiblility that Lucy was suggesting I LOVE LUCY was her "last chance" at being a star in the classes of course this was ridiculously not true, she was a very big movie star in the late 40s/early 50s, two big hits with Bob Hope and two more great comedies toplining herself just in the immedate period before ILL and had just turned down a a major role in the biggest film of the year THE GREATEST SHOW ON EARTH and had the ILL pilot not sold I have no doubt she would have been in demand on television in some form or another if not as a team with Desi, look at who would become the great tv stars of the era, Ann Sothern who was more of a B level star than Lucy ever was, Eve Arden a supporting player now a star on tv, Martha Raye who barely did anything on film in the 40s, Gracie Allen who I don't think was in a movie since the late 30's, Imogene Coca who couldn't get employed in movies. There's no way somebody wouldn't have grabbed her for tv at some point in the 1950's.

 

One has to give the late Shirley Hemphill props though for never exploiting this incident herself for publicity in the 1990's which she could have easily done. I thought she was pretty funny on WH and did a very good guest appearance on GOOD TIMES as a slow-witted robber. it is pretty ironic that that short-lived sitcom she starred in ONE IN A MILLION in 1980 or so was initially supposed to be a comeback vehicle for Desi Arnaz.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I just got around to this thread too. I’ll do my comments for the article and then for what you guys have said.

 

I think the author was expecting “Lucy” and was a little shocked when she got “Lucille”. I don’t think at this time many people really knew how different these two really were. The way she describes how Lucy arrived and the “green room” stuff is funny but also believable. Yet again expecting a big star to walk in and getting a rather down to earth person. I find it funny that Lucy made sure to have those lips and then has no eye makeup on. We here know from examining her look so much that those lips were overdrawn and she looked really different without the lashes not to mention any eye makeup. I’ve seen Mike Stern’s photos from his classes he took with her and Lucy wore those dark glasses a lot too, so not really a need for all the makeup. And wardrobe wise let the lady be comfortable. She’s just chatting with you guys, not doing something on camera.

 

Concerning the Vaseline, I would have opted for chapstick for the same effect but if you watch Lucy on talk shows in the 70’s and 80’s she seemed to always get cotton mouth. I think some meds she was on were affecting her and yeah if she is doing all the talking for 2 hours or whatever that will dry out your mouth.

 

The Lela story and how she launches into it is sad. Lela was a huge part of her early career. Taught her so much professionally but was also like a mother in a way. I can see that she would have been very upset to have just learned of her death. Couple that with the fact that Lucy was now going to go teach a bunch of students, I can see how a flood of memories and emotions came back to her. She might not have had time to process all this yet and this was her first time talking since learning of the death. As far as what she said, she was honest. It’s a ruthless, cutthroat business and she was not going to sugar coat it for these people. You have to want to succeeded more than you want to breath sometimes and her bluntness about it either was going to push you to overcome or make you realize this was not what you were meant to do. Lucy was lucky and said it many times that she was fortunate to have the studio system but that these younger people were all on their own.

 

I’ve sat in lectures and master classes in college listening to crap stories about the entertainment industry and seeing it first hand in my internship. I realized Hollywood was not it for me. I did not want to give up everything to only hope to make it. There was more I wanted out of life. It was an eye opening experience for me.

On to the ILL creation story. Lucy was known for her embellishment and elaboration of stories. This sounds like one of those. Yeah she had been around the block a lot by that point but it wasn’t like she wasn’t getting work. Now the personal life on the other had may have had it’s days number if they hadn’t done ILL but it also had it’s expiration date when they first became a huge success with it, they just didn’t know it at the time. The insurance thing I have never heard about and I wonder if this story is even true, it makes no sense. They owned the films because CBS didn’t want to front the money to shoot the thing on film. Desi had the idea to take the cut in salary to front the extra money but in return to own the films. CBS was contributing money to this show and I find it hard to believe they were in such dire financial stress having to put up so much of their money it required a second mortgage. Yeah they were producing it under the production company name, but with a little research anyone can debunk this whole story.

 

The Carole Lombard story has been recounted many times and we all know Lucy was very insecure. I think what Carole really was saying was to forget whatever fears she may have had about this new endeavor and “go for it”. Or at least that is how I’ve always heard the story.

 

Stu on his radio shows talks about this lecture series he attended with Lucy. He did the one at Northridge and that is where their association began Mike Stern may have been in this class written about. I know he attended a couple. I have to check his book to be sure. From both their stories I get a very different idea about these classes. Stu said that for his they only had it open to TV/Film students but had not been able to fill it and opened it to more people. I think this may have happened here too. Many in attendance were there for the opportunity to see a star. Few were there to really learn. Lucy approached it as the teacher there to provide all her wisdom and experience, not to reminisce about the glory days. There is a time and a place and this wasn’t it. Stu said that those who were there to celebrity gawk gradually dropped out when they realized they were not getting “Lucy”. I’m with Stu here. I would have loved to pick her brain. The AM America show is a good idea of what these were like and Lucy is blunt here but knows she is on TV so I don’t think is too harsh. Neil the class you heard, is it much different than AM America?

 

Neil you say she may not have enjoyed these. I think it may have been because of what I stated here. She went in thinking here was this opportunity to impart her many years of experience. In the beginning of each one she had to get through those “we love”, “oh we just want to talk about how great ILL was”, and people who were there just to be in her presence. She went in as her normal, blunt, down-to-earth self in a casual environment where she didn’t have to be “on”. She wasn’t there for love and praise but kept getting it. I can see how it would get old and frustrating when that was not the purpose here.

 

Neil you also talk about post 74’. I rewatched that Donahue interview that is on YouTube the other night. The series had just ended and Mame was coming out. She talks a lot about the movie and her career with him and then does a lengthy QandA with the audience. She was quick, blunt, and optimistic is how I felt. She talks a lot about the upcoming specials and how she’s not retiring. She has such a good sounding outlook on the decade. She sounds like she is very happy and is taking care of herself physically. Contrast that with the BW 77’ interview where she mentions how depressed she really was after realizing she did not have the TV pattern that she had since 51’. It was like she had so much hope but reality hit and hit her hard.

 

Claude you are right about her bluntness. I’m certain that she was always like that. It’s a trait that many people can not understand. I’m like that myself and it does take people a little bit to figure it out. Charlie is more so than me and sometimes I have to apologize for him. So for those many, many people to only know what they see on screen it is a huge shock. This trait about her does not make me love her any less. She also was incredible kind and warm as many, many people have said. If she really was this cold as some people imply, would so many people have been so loyal to her over the years. It was like a test. If you were a no BS person she could come to rely on you. You then had the same goals to just get the work done well. Once she liked you, she loved you. I love that she had no ego for people fawning all over her. It’s something that makes me hate so many stars today.

 

Stu made another comment on one of his broadcasts. He was referring to Lee’s book here and how Lee painted this picture of how sad Lucy was in the last 10 years. Stu said this was not the Lucy he knew. Stu said that many times he would stop by the house to drop off tapes, etc.. and she was joking and easy going. When Life With Lucy was cancelled Lucy went around to each person on that staff and checked to see if they were going to be okay and if they had something else they could go to. Not that she didn’t have incredible sadness at this time, but I feel comfort that he did witness a happy Lucy in this last decade.

 

She wasn’t Norma Desmond all locked up in her mansion talking about the glory days. I also think she could have worked a lot more but 3 things held her back. First her own insecurities to try something new. To say to hell with what the fans want and realize she was an actress first and foremost and do something that was not comedy or not the comedy she was known for. To not compete against your younger self. She did take a chance with Stone Pillow and I know it didn’t get good reviews but it wasn’t seething hate like LWL got and she didn’t get some huge fan backlash from it.

 

Second is projects that she could have done or considered probably did not make their way to her held up by Gary vetoing them before they did, or him telling her it was not a good idea to do them.

 

Third was her health. Stone Pillow did affect it but from all observations I’ve heard from the LWL set she had the stamina to work. Small roles in movies would have been easy. Lee mentioned about showing Lucy a play he thought she should do and Lucy seemed interested. Plays no, as she would not be able to last the 8 shows a week based on the Wildcat experience. Stick to the screen with a less grueling schedule. Once we get past the LWL debacle that is where the depression hit and really affected her health. I just don’t think there was a way to bounce back fully because no project would have been so well received it would have renewed her confidence. She just needed to get out there and work, not accept awards and appear on a bunch of specials.

 

I was too young in the 80’s but from what I can see of what she appeared on in the 80’s Lucy did show up pretty regularly to help with any shock you get from seeing an old star show up out of nowhere and say “they got old”. Betty White has Golden Girls reruns all over the place now but when I watch Hot In Cleveland I see an older woman but one who still loves her work even though she is in her 90’s and does look a lot older but it’s not shocking and no one is comparing her to her younger self.

 

 

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I just got around to this thread too. I’ll do my comments for the article and then for what you guys have said.

 

I think the author was expecting “Lucy” and was a little shocked when she got “Lucille”. I don’t think at this time many people really knew how different these two really were. The way she describes how Lucy arrived and the “green room” stuff is funny but also believable. Yet again expecting a big star to walk in and getting a rather down to earth person. I find it funny that Lucy made sure to have those lips and then has no eye makeup on. We here know from examining her look so much that those lips were overdrawn and she looked really different without the lashes not to mention any eye makeup. I’ve seen Mike Stern’s photos from his classes he took with her and Lucy wore those dark glasses a lot too, so not really a need for all the makeup. And wardrobe wise let the lady be comfortable. She’s just chatting with you guys, not doing something on camera.

 

Concerning the Vaseline, I would have opted for chapstick for the same effect but if you watch Lucy on talk shows in the 70’s and 80’s she seemed to always get cotton mouth. I think some meds she was on were affecting her and yeah if she is doing all the talking for 2 hours or whatever that will dry out your mouth.

 

The Lela story and how she launches into it is sad. Lela was a huge part of her early career. Taught her so much professionally but was also like a mother in a way. I can see that she would have been very upset to have just learned of her death. Couple that with the fact that Lucy was now going to go teach a bunch of students, I can see how a flood of memories and emotions came back to her. She might not have had time to process all this yet and this was her first time talking since learning of the death. As far as what she said, she was honest. It’s a ruthless, cutthroat business and she was not going to sugar coat it for these people. You have to want to succeeded more than you want to breath sometimes and her bluntness about it either was going to push you to overcome or make you realize this was not what you were meant to do. Lucy was lucky and said it many times that she was fortunate to have the studio system but that these younger people were all on their own.

 

I’ve sat in lectures and master classes in college listening to crap stories about the entertainment industry and seeing it first hand in my internship. I realized Hollywood was not it for me. I did not want to give up everything to only hope to make it. There was more I wanted out of life. It was an eye opening experience for me.

On to the ILL creation story. Lucy was known for her embellishment and elaboration of stories. This sounds like one of those. Yeah she had been around the block a lot by that point but it wasn’t like she wasn’t getting work. Now the personal life on the other had may have had it’s days number if they hadn’t done ILL but it also had it’s expiration date when they first became a huge success with it, they just didn’t know it at the time. The insurance thing I have never heard about and I wonder if this story is even true, it makes no sense. They owned the films because CBS didn’t want to front the money to shoot the thing on film. Desi had the idea to take the cut in salary to front the extra money but in return to own the films. CBS was contributing money to this show and I find it hard to believe they were in such dire financial stress having to put up so much of their money it required a second mortgage. Yeah they were producing it under the production company name, but with a little research anyone can debunk this whole story.

 

The Carole Lombard story has been recounted many times and we all know Lucy was very insecure. I think what Carole really was saying was to forget whatever fears she may have had about this new endeavor and “go for it”. Or at least that is how I’ve always heard the story.

 

Stu on his radio shows talks about this lecture series he attended with Lucy. He did the one at Northridge and that is where their association began Mike Stern may have been in this class written about. I know he attended a couple. I have to check his book to be sure. From both their stories I get a very different idea about these classes. Stu said that for his they only had it open to TV/Film students but had not been able to fill it and opened it to more people. I think this may have happened here too. Many in attendance were there for the opportunity to see a star. Few were there to really learn. Lucy approached it as the teacher there to provide all her wisdom and experience, not to reminisce about the glory days. There is a time and a place and this wasn’t it. Stu said that those who were there to celebrity gawk gradually dropped out when they realized they were not getting “Lucy”. I’m with Stu here. I would have loved to pick her brain. The AM America show is a good idea of what these were like and Lucy is blunt here but knows she is on TV so I don’t think is too harsh. Neil the class you heard, is it much different than AM America?

 

Neil you say she may not have enjoyed these. I think it may have been because of what I stated here. She went in thinking here was this opportunity to impart her many years of experience. In the beginning of each one she had to get through those “we love”, “oh we just want to talk about how great ILL was”, and people who were there just to be in her presence. She went in as her normal, blunt, down-to-earth self in a casual environment where she didn’t have to be “on”. She wasn’t there for love and praise but kept getting it. I can see how it would get old and frustrating when that was not the purpose here.

 

Neil you also talk about post 74’. I rewatched that Donahue interview that is on YouTube the other night. The series had just ended and Mame was coming out. She talks a lot about the movie and her career with him and then does a lengthy QandA with the audience. She was quick, blunt, and optimistic is how I felt. She talks a lot about the upcoming specials and how she’s not retiring. She has such a good sounding outlook on the decade. She sounds like she is very happy and is taking care of herself physically. Contrast that with the BW 77’ interview where she mentions how depressed she really was after realizing she did not have the TV pattern that she had since 51’. It was like she had so much hope but reality hit and hit her hard.

 

Claude you are right about her bluntness. I’m certain that she was always like that. It’s a trait that many people can not understand. I’m like that myself and it does take people a little bit to figure it out. Charlie is more so than me and sometimes I have to apologize for him. So for those many, many people to only know what they see on screen it is a huge shock. This trait about her does not make me love her any less. She also was incredible kind and warm as many, many people have said. If she really was this cold as some people imply, would so many people have been so loyal to her over the years. It was like a test. If you were a no BS person she could come to rely on you. You then had the same goals to just get the work done well. Once she liked you, she loved you. I love that she had no ego for people fawning all over her. It’s something that makes me hate so many stars today.

 

Stu made another comment on one of his broadcasts. He was referring to Lee’s book here and how Lee painted this picture of how sad Lucy was in the last 10 years. Stu said this was not the Lucy he knew. Stu said that many times he would stop by the house to drop off tapes, etc.. and she was joking and easy going. When Life With Lucy was cancelled Lucy went around to each person on that staff and checked to see if they were going to be okay and if they had something else they could go to. Not that she didn’t have incredible sadness at this time, but I feel comfort that he did witness a happy Lucy in this last decade.

 

She wasn’t Norma Desmond all locked up in her mansion talking about the glory days. I also think she could have worked a lot more but 3 things held her back. First her own insecurities to try something new. To say to hell with what the fans want and realize she was an actress first and foremost and do something that was not comedy or not the comedy she was known for. To not compete against your younger self. She did take a chance with Stone Pillow and I know it didn’t get good reviews but it wasn’t seething hate like LWL got and she didn’t get some huge fan backlash from it.

 

Second is projects that she could have done or considered probably did not make their way to her held up by Gary vetoing them before they did, or him telling her it was not a good idea to do them.

 

Third was her health. Stone Pillow did affect it but from all observations I’ve heard from the LWL set she had the stamina to work. Small roles in movies would have been easy. Lee mentioned about showing Lucy a play he thought she should do and Lucy seemed interested. Plays no, as she would not be able to last the 8 shows a week based on the Wildcat experience. Stick to the screen with a less grueling schedule. Once we get past the LWL debacle that is where the depression hit and really affected her health. I just don’t think there was a way to bounce back fully because no project would have been so well received it would have renewed her confidence. She just needed to get out there and work, not accept awards and appear on a bunch of specials.

 

I was too young in the 80’s but from what I can see of what she appeared on in the 80’s Lucy did show up pretty regularly to help with any shock you get from seeing an old star show up out of nowhere and say “they got old”. Betty White has Golden Girls reruns all over the place now but when I watch Hot In Cleveland I see an older woman but one who still loves her work even though she is in her 90’s and does look a lot older but it’s not shocking and no one is comparing her to her younger self.

Very well said luv.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Isn't she verbose? LOVE Luv's posts!! I always learn something!! Thanks, Luv!

And i got news for ya, until I read her lengthy post, I didn't even know there was a link to that article in the very first post by Neil. Kept wondering why everybody was making comments that had nothing to do with the seminars.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

I was listening to an achieved episode of Stu’s radio show the other day and he talks about his experience with these classes Lucy taught.  The one he attended was a 15 week 3 credit course.  This was at Cal State Northridge.  From what I could put together Lucy had been doing this thing in seminar form for a few years but this class was a much more involved, longer version of those seminars.  It was open to all majors and he said that is what hurt the class as many did not ask questions.

 

Basically here is how the class went.  It was 3 hours long over 15 Monday nights.  It was graded on participation only.  Lucy talked a lot about acting and would bring in episodes of the show to watch.  Stu said that Gary came in for a few weeks and talked about how a show was put together and all the behind the scenes stuff both technically and on the business end.  Stu said that since Lucy was an actress first and never got much into that end he learned more in those Gary weeks because Stu was a production guy and that is what he wanted to do.  Seems to me that it was a 2 fold class.  Learn to act and learn the business.    

 

On YouTube currently there is a Merv Griffin episode where Lucy talks about these classes and points out Stu in the audience.  She said there is a guy who gets it.  She talked about how hard doing a class like that was to grade and seemed a little frustrated.  I think she enjoyed doing the seminars but the class may have been a little overwhelming for her to have something that intense.

 

One story he shared I think shed a big light on a person.  Stu was debating on taking the class even though he was a huge fan of Lucy.  Through a job he had he knew Herbert K. and knew he had directed Lucy in HL and back in the 40’s in Dream Girl.  Stu asked him his opinion on if he should take the class.  Herb says “are you a fan, do you really like the version of her you think you know”?  Stu says yes.  Herb says, “don’t take the class.  She’s a bitch and she will burst your bubble on the impression you have of her.”  He was really laying it on thick how much he really did not like her and how big of a bitch he thought she was.  Even made a crack about how she directs all her shows and you just sit on the side and watch.  Luckily Stu sought the advice of his advisor who talked him into taking the class and I don’t think he had his bubble burst as he is very candid about Lucy.

 

This just reinforced my opinion of Herb being a really crappy guy.  I put this story with the Joan Rivers show he was on in the early 90’s and all the interview quotes in Lucy books and he is one guy who did not like her.  I don’t know anything about the man, but he paints Lucy as one crazy mean, bitchy lady.  It’s such a contrast as to how anyone else talks about her.  Yes they acknowledge that she could come across that way but it seems like others understood where it came from and also weighted that against the many positive aspects of her personality to give a much fuller version of the woman.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I was listening to an achieved episode of Stu’s radio show the other day and he talks about his experience with these classes Lucy taught.  The one he attended was a 15 week 3 credit course.  This was at Cal State Northridge.  From what I could put together Lucy had been doing this thing in seminar form for a few years but this class was a much more involved, longer version of those seminars.  It was open to all majors and he said that is what hurt the class as many did not ask questions.

 

Basically here is how the class went.  It was 3 hours long over 15 Monday nights.  It was graded on participation only.  Lucy talked a lot about acting and would bring in episodes of the show to watch.  Stu said that Gary came in for a few weeks and talked about how a show was put together and all the behind the scenes stuff both technically and on the business end.  Stu said that since Lucy was an actress first and never got much into that end he learned more in those Gary weeks because Stu was a production guy and that is what he wanted to do.  Seems to me that it was a 2 fold class.  Learn to act and learn the business.    

 

On YouTube currently there is a Merv Griffin episode where Lucy talks about these classes and points out Stu in the audience.  She said there is a guy who gets it.  She talked about how hard doing a class like that was to grade and seemed a little frustrated.  I think she enjoyed doing the seminars but the class may have been a little overwhelming for her to have something that intense.

 

One story he shared I think shed a big light on a person.  Stu was debating on taking the class even though he was a huge fan of Lucy.  Through a job he had he knew Herbert K. and knew he had directed Lucy in HL and back in the 40’s in Dream Girl.  Stu asked him his opinion on if he should take the class.  Herb says “are you a fan, do you really like the version of her you think you know”?  Stu says yes.  Herb says, “don’t take the class.  She’s a bitch and she will burst your bubble on the impression you have of her.”  He was really laying it on thick how much he really did not like her and how big of a bitch he thought she was.  Even made a crack about how she directs all her shows and you just sit on the side and watch.  Luckily Stu sought the advice of his advisor who talked him into taking the class and I don’t think he had his bubble burst as he is very candid about Lucy.

 

This just reinforced my opinion of Herb being a really crappy guy.  I put this story with the Joan Rivers show he was on in the early 90’s and all the interview quotes in Lucy books and he is one guy who did not like her.  I don’t know anything about the man, but he paints Lucy as one crazy mean, bitchy lady.  It’s such a contrast as to how anyone else talks about her.  Yes they acknowledge that she could come across that way but it seems like others understood where it came from and also weighted that against the many positive aspects of her personality to give a much fuller version of the woman.

HERBIE AND THAT OTHER FRUSTRATED OLD QUEEN MAURY WERE THE TWO BITCHY ONES, OLD FASHIONED MALES WHO JUST COULD NOT TAKE A WOMAN IN POWER.  I don't even know if maury, or moron as I call him, was gay but he sure acted the part of a frustrated old queen. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Look, she was crusty..she had been in a male dominated world...she had to surrvive some how. Yeah, she was direct, sometimes tactless, a real brassy.broad. I LOVE the character she played and respect the woman. I dont think she intended to be a mean witch, I just think that is what she learned in order to cope with.her enviroment. Cmon all really successful people have a SIDE to.them... I wonder what Debbie Reynold's other side is.like....I hope not too brassy as I love Debbie...but Lucille's brashness endears me ...go figure..guess it's the gay gene...my people have a thing for the.brassy.broads lol

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Look, she was crusty..she had been in a male dominated world...she had to surrvive some how. Yeah, she was direct, sometimes tactless, a real brassy.broad. I LOVE the character she played and respect the woman. I dont think she intended to be a mean witch, I just think that is what she learned in order to cope with.her enviroment. Cmon all really successful people have a SIDE to.them... I wonder what Debbie Reynold's other side is.like....I hope not too brassy as I love Debbie...but Lucille's brashness endears me ...go figure..guess it's the gay gene...my people have a thing for the.brassy.broads lol

True, but remember that just as many people think she was NOT the beeatch these two morons think.  And yes, like Carol telling her Lucy story, I will again repeat that Bette and Kate were exactly the same.  There was only one way to succeed in a man's world, show you could be the same.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...