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Lizabeth Scott has died


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Lizabeth Scott, Lucy's co-star in Easy Living, has died at the age of 92.

 

Lizabeth Scott, a sultry blonde with a come-hither voice cut out for the seething romantic and homicidal passions of her Hollywood film noir roles in the late 1940s and early ’50s, died on Jan. 31 in Los Angeles. She was 92.

 

Cedars-Sinai Medical Center confirmed the death, but did not give a cause.

 

Ms. Scott was billed as another Lauren Bacall or Veronica Lake, and in many of her 22 films she portrayed a good-bad girl with love in her head and larceny in her heart, or vice versa. Her co-stars were Humphrey Bogart, Kirk Douglas, Burt Lancaster and other tough gents, and her movies’ titles were lurid stuff: “The Strange Love of Martha Ivers,” “Dead Reckoning,” “Pitfall,” “Dark City,” “I Walk Alone” and “Bad for Each Other.”

 

"When you say ambition to me, that’s when you get me started!" Ms. Scott was widely quoted as saying. "My greatest ambition is to be the whoppingest best actress in Hollywood. You can’t blame a girl for trying! I don’t want to be classed as a ‘personality,’ something to stare at. I want to have my talents respected, not only by the public but by myself."

 

She had the goods: the luminous eyes and moist lips that belied a heart of stone, the slinky figure, the sculptured cheekbones, the cascading hair and husky voice suitable for torch songs or seductive close-ups. She gave a riveting performance as a killer in “Too Late for Tears” in 1949 and was captivating as Charlton Heston’s singer girlfriend in the revenge thriller “Dark City” in 1950.

 

By then postwar film noir was losing its appeal, and her last foray into the genre was in “The Racket” (1951), with Robert Mitchum and Robert Ryan. Later in the ’50s she drifted into mediocre melodramas and even a western.

 

Ms. Scott’s heyday lasted barely a decade, and film historians say it never matched the Bacall magic or the Lake sensuality. Her later performances were scorned by many critics, though some said she was thoroughly convincing in unsympathetic roles.

 

Her film career was further damaged, perhaps fatally, by an innuendo-laced 1954 article in Confidential magazine suggesting that she was a lesbian. The article noted that she had never married, quoted her as saying that she “always wore male colognes, slept in men’s pajamas and positively hated frilly feminine dresses,” and said that she had been “taking up almost exclusively with Hollywood’s weird society of baritone babes.”

 

Ms. Scott sued for $2.5 million, contending that the magazine had portrayed her in a “vicious, slanderous and indecent” manner. The outcome was never made public, but the suit, filed in 1955, was believed to have been settled out of court for an undisclosed sum. The scandal, however, was nearly ruinous. She made two more unremarkable films in the 1950s, then turned to singing, recording for RCA Records.

 

There were also television appearances, on game shows and occasionally on drama series including “Studio 57,” “The 20th Century Fox Hour,” “Adventures in Paradise” and “The Third Man.” She performed on radio shows like “The Lux Radio Theater,” and even did television voice-overs for juice and cat-food commercials. She appeared in her last film, “Pulp,” with Michael Caine and Mickey Rooney, in 1972.

 

In her later years, Ms. Scott led a quiet, largely private life. She helped raise funds for museums, art galleries and charities, including hemophilia research and hunger, and turned down many requests for interviews and guest appearances. There were rumors in the 1960s that she might marry Hal B. Wallis, the producer who discovered her, but she remained single.

 

The film historian Karen Burroughs Hannsberry, in “Femme Noir: Bad Girls of Film” (1998), called Ms. Scott “a unique product of Hollywood’s Golden Age” and “one of film noir’s archetypal femmes.”

 

She was born Emma Matzo on Sept. 29, 1922, in Scranton, Pa., one of six children of Ukrainian immigrants. She attended Marywood College, but quit to move to New York City. She enrolled at the Alvienne School of Drama, got work in summer stock and modeling and started calling herself Elizabeth Scott. Information on survivors was not immediately available.

 

In 1942, Ms. Scott was the understudy for Tallulah Bankhead in the Broadway production of Thornton Wilder’s “The Skin of Our Teeth” but had no chance to substitute. When Miriam Hopkins replaced Bankhead in 1943, Ms. Scott returned to modeling. But she was called back to the show to fill in for an ailing Gladys George, who had replaced Hopkins. She won rave reviews, and played the lead in the play’s Boston run.

 

Mr. Wallis noticed her. Screen tests and a Paramount contract followed. She had already dropped the “E” in her first name — “to be different,” she said. She made her film debut in “You Came Along” (1945), then was cast in “The Strange Love of Martha Ivers” (1946), with Barbara Stanwyck and Kirk Douglas. Her scenes were limited, but reviewers praised her performance.

 

Her breakthrough was “Dead Reckoning” (1947), opposite Bogart. In her ensuing mystery-thrillers — “I Walk Alone” and “Pitfall” in 1948, “Too Late for Tears” in 1949, “Paid in Full” in 1950 — she joined the classic pantheon of film noir: beautiful schemers caught in maelstroms of jealousy, greed, betrayal and murder, but irresistible.

 

Bogart, in “Dead Reckoning,” put it this way:

 

“I didn’t want any part of her, but I kept smelling that jasmine in her hair, and I wanted her in my arms. Yeah. I knew I was walking into something.”

 

http://mobile.nytimes.com/2015/02/07/movies/lizabeth-scott-film-noir-siren-dies-at-92.html?referrer=

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Always got Lizabeth Scott and Veronica Lake mixed up.

If she made her last film at age 50, one wonders how she supported herself during her "later years" which were longer than her adult life up to the time of her last film.

I don't know if Liz was gay or not, but it's sad that a "Confidential" article suggesting she liked the company of "baritone babes" (although I must admit I enjoy the term) could ruin a career.  She was only in her 30s at the time.  Confidential always equated homosexuality with lewd behavior. As did the public at large: one of the reasons legal gay bashing lasted as long as it did (and still continues, of course).

For a very tragic example, go see the movie "The Imitation Game".  Great movie.  The fact that he's gay is not the focal point of movie. But here is a guy who's code breaking was instrumental in winning the war who is later disgraced because of "gross indecency".

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A terrific film noir actress, she was/is often written off as a poor man's Lauren Bacall but I think she was a far better actress than Mrs. Bogart.  I can see mixing her up with Veronica too although the Lake lady was considerably better looking though not as strong an actress.  I think Lizabeth must have been bi because she was long alleged to have been producer Hal B Wallis' mistress.  It's odd how those nasty Confidential stories toppled some stars but others it was like nothing was published (ie: Tab Hunter, who went on to bigger things after he was venomously outed circa 1954.)

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A terrific film noir actress, she was/is often written off as a poor man's Lauren Bacall but I think she was a far better actress than Mrs. Bogart.  I can see mixing her up with Veronica too although the Lake lady was considerably better looking though not as strong an actress.  I think Lizabeth must have been bi because she was long alleged to have been producer Hal B Wallis' mistress.  It's odd how those nasty Confidential stories toppled some stars but others it was like nothing was published (ie: Tab Hunter, who went on to bigger things after he was venomously outed circa 1954.)

Veronica Lake had a special hairdo that differentiated her from all other actresses, she had her hair. long and sweeping covering one whole side of her face, especially her eye.  You say she was beautiful, just saw a pic of her on one of the gay websites and at ninety two, she was pretty scary looking.  Fact remains that the beautiful in Hollywood were always cursed in the end, the beauty faded and some got real bad in their golden years, think Yvonne DeCarlo or even Kathryn Grayson, they got overly made up or quite heavy set and were far removed from the Goddesses they used to be, not everybody aged well like Cary Grant or even Tab Hunter that you mentioned, but i think it was even harder on the women who had to stop working as they were considered over the hill at forty.  

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Always got Lizabeth Scott and Veronica Lake mixed up.

If she made her last film at age 50, one wonders how she supported herself during her "later years" which were longer than her adult life up to the time of her last film.

I don't know if Liz was gay or not, but it's sad that a "Confidential" article suggesting she liked the company of "baritone babes" (although I must admit I enjoy the term) could ruin a career.  She was only in her 30s at the time.  Confidential always equated homosexuality with lewd behavior. As did the public at large: one of the reasons legal gay bashing lasted as long as it did (and still continues, of course).

For a very tragic example, go see the movie "The Imitation Game".  Great movie.  The fact that he's gay is not the focal point of movie. But here is a guy who's code breaking was instrumental in winning the war who is later disgraced because of "gross indecency".

Yup, and they did what Hollywood ALWAYS does with any character who was gay, they gloss over it but they shouldn't have in The Imitation Game because as you say, he helped win the war with his decoding of the Nazi enigma code which took two years off the war as Churchill once said but because he was gay, the man who invented the computer was vilified, and the Queen just pardoned him very recently, no matter, he committed suicide much too early, now almost fifty thousand homosexual men and women suffered the same fate but because their accomplishments were not as noteworthy, they have not been pardoned and their legacy is the antiquated thinking of a generation of Brits, so sad really and now you'd think with the film coming out, they would set the world straight so to speak but noooooooooooooooooooooooo, that crap still goes on to this day.

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Always got Lizabeth Scott and Veronica Lake mixed up.

If she made her last film at age 50, one wonders how she supported herself during her "later years" which were longer than her adult life up to the time of her last film.

I don't know if Liz was gay or not, but it's sad that a "Confidential" article suggesting she liked the company of "baritone babes" (although I must admit I enjoy the term) could ruin a career.  She was only in her 30s at the time.  Confidential always equated homosexuality with lewd behavior. As did the public at large: one of the reasons legal gay bashing lasted as long as it did (and still continues, of course).

For a very tragic example, go see the movie "The Imitation Game".  Great movie.  The fact that he's gay is not the focal point of movie. But here is a guy who's code breaking was instrumental in winning the war who is later disgraced because of "gross indecency".

 

I saw Imitation Game last week.  I knew a little about Alan Turing's story, but watching the movie stirred up a lot of emotions at the end.  As soon as the movie ended, my friend immediately asked me what I thought of it but I couldn't speak.  I was sitting there thinking, here's this guy whose actions saved an estimated 14 million lives, saved his country, and later made it possible for us to have these very devices the entire world is so dependent upon, that we are communicating on right now: computers.  He impacted all of our lives.  Yet, just nine years after saving his country, that same society he saved turned around and paid him back by humiliating him and driving him to suicide.

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I saw Imitation Game last week.  I knew a little about Alan Turing's story, but watching the movie stirred up a lot of emotions at the end.  As soon as the movie ended, my friend immediately asked me what I thought of it but I couldn't speak.  I was sitting there thinking, here's this guy whose actions saved an estimated 14 million lives, saved his country, and later made it possible for us to have these very devices the entire world is so dependent upon, that we are communicating on right now: computers.  He impacted all of our lives.  Yet, just nine years after saving his country, that same society he saved turned around and paid him back by humiliating him and driving him to suicide.

We forget how different things were BACK THEN for some who turned into trailblazers in getting us rights and now marriage equality, they fought for us to get to where we are today, thank God.  Pioneers like Mr Turing should be admired by society but unless more movies like this one are made, the next generations won't even know they ever existed.

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We forget how different things were BACK THEN for some who turned into trailblazers in getting us rights and now marriage equality, they fought for us to get to where we are today, thank God.  Pioneers like Mr Turing should be admired by society but unless more movies like this one are made, the next generations won't even know they ever existed.

 

And "back then" was really a very short time ago.  I do hope to see more movies like this.  It's a big lesson not to hate and judge people because every life matters, and the person you are hating on might be the same one who saves your life.

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And "back then" was really a very short time ago.  I do hope to see more movies like this.  It's a big lesson not to hate and judge people because every life matters, and the person you are hating on might be the same one who saves your life.

True, and let's not forget that The Imitation Game is watered down, they gloss over so much to make it more palatable for the mass audiences, Hollywood's been doing that since the beginning of film.  In the beginning, one would only hear about the six million Jews who died in the Holocaust, but later, much later, we found out about the gays and gypsies and anybody else who did not fit the arian dream nation.  When i read your post, i aws reminded of the famous saying back then, FIRST THEY CAME FOR THE JEWS AND I SAID NOTHING, THEN THEY CAME FOR THE  . . . . . . . AND THEN THEY CAME FOR THE  . . . . AND THEN THEY CAME FOR ME, BUT THERE WAS NOBODY LEFT TO STOP THEM.

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True, and let's not forget that The Imitation Game is watered down, they gloss over so much to make it more palatable for the mass audiences, Hollywood's been doing that since the beginning of film.  In the beginning, one would only hear about the six million Jews who died in the Holocaust, but later, much later, we found out about the gays and gypsies and anybody else who did not fit the arian dream nation.  When i read your post, i aws reminded of the famous saying back then, FIRST THEY CAME FOR THE JEWS AND I SAID NOTHING, THEN THEY CAME FOR THE  . . . . . . . AND THEN THEY CAME FOR THE  . . . . AND THEN THEY CAME FOR ME, BUT THERE WAS NOBODY LEFT TO STOP THEM.

 

Oh yes, I love that wonderful quote!  And I do agree with you that the movie glossed over some crucial things in his life.  Most significantly (for me) was that all they had about his suicide was a little written text before the closing credits.  It's probably obvious to the viewer what caused his suicide; however, although it might be a bit hard to take, a minute or two depicting that final anguish would have been appropriate.

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Oh yes, I love that wonderful quote!  And I do agree with you that the movie glossed over some crucial things in his life.  Most significantly (for me) was that all they had about his suicide was a little written text before the closing credits.  It's probably obvious to the viewer what caused his suicide; however, although it might be a bit hard to take, a minute or two depicting that final anguish would have been appropriate.

Exactly, but Hollywood is always looking at how they can maximize their profit margin and they stay away from anything that could tamper with it, real or imagined.  One day, they will remake all these movies with gay themes and you might be lucky enough to see a version where it's all truth and no bull at all, i won't live to see that but you probably will.

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I don't think you're that much older than me.  :)

I dunno bout that, i used to play with Moses at school recess, me and THE KIDS would go bowling together after school, there was Betty White and Larry King and that little Philbin kid.  Oh i'm real old, used to date Luise Reiner, on the rebound from Olivia DeHavilland.  Lizabeth Scott must be turning over in her grave wondering what happened to her thread.

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I dunno bout that, i used to play with Moses at school recess, me and THE KIDS would go bowling together after school, there was Betty White and Larry King and that little Philbin kid.  Oh i'm real old, used to date Luise Reiner, on the rebound from Olivia DeHavilland.  Lizabeth Scott must be turning over in her grave wondering what happened to her thread.

... and he knew God when He was a child! ;):lucyhmm::MrsRichardCarlson:

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As one of only two Loungers who has met you both, I feel obligated to respond to this, but so many delightful responses come to mind it is so hard to pick just one. :D

Oh, forgetful little me, is that a famous Lucy Lounger?  The one who visited Shelly?  Or the one who used to star on the show?  Well, i betcha HE's not getting his first social security check this coming August!

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Oh, forgetful little me, is that a famous Lucy Lounger?  The one who visited Shelly?  Or the one who used to star on the show?  Well, i betcha HE's not getting his first social security check this coming August!

 

 

Sorry to disappoint, but I have nothing in my background that would qualify me for any sort of fame. No one ever said "get me that face!"  No, I'm just an average OLD Joe, honored that Brock met me.  :)  And I join the others with my apologies to Lizabeth Scott.

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Sorry to disappoint, but I have nothing in my background that would qualify me for any sort of fame. No one ever said "get me that face!"  No, I'm just an average OLD Joe, honored that Brock met me.  :)  And I join the others with my apologies to Lizabeth Scott.

Sorry i brought that up, it was the meeting Brock that got me on the wrong track.  As for Ms Scott, was she of Lebanese descent as they say on Golden Girls, so the foray into gay material would still be deemed appropriate.

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Sorry i brought that up, it was the meeting Brock that got me on the wrong track.  As for Ms Scott, was she of Lebanese descent as they say on Golden Girls, so the foray into gay material would still be deemed appropriate.

 

Well, the '50s tabloids implied that, and she never married, so could be.  Whatever the case, I hope she managed to find happiness in her life.

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