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Lucy on "Van Dyke & Company" (CLIP)


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Here is a clip from the open sketch of Lucy's guest appearance on "Van Dyke & Company" in 1976. It was announced a while back that the show was going to get a DVD release, but I haven't heard anything more about it. I wonder what happened.

 

 

That was great! Makes me want those elusive DVDs all the more! lucydisgust.JPG

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Here is a clip from the open sketch of Lucy's guest appearance on "Van Dyke & Company" in 1976. It was announced a while back that the show was going to get a DVD release, but I haven't heard anything more about it. I wonder what happened.

 

 

"Van Dyke" won the Emmy as Outstanding Variety series even though it had long been canceled. It barely lasted half a season.

By this time, TV variety were gasping for its last breaths. I don't think it was because there wasn't an audience for variety either. It's just by this time, the method of production sucked any spontaneity out of these shows, with the notable exception of "Carol Burnett". They sacrificed the "live" look for ease of production. They were put together piece-meal and if there was any audience at all, the response was sweetened beyond believability. They didn't think we would notice, but we did--even if it was only subconsciously. They just weren't "fun" anymore. I blame a lot of this on producer George Schlatter and Laugh-In. The focus of these shows shifted from music to comedy. Pre-recording used to be done only as a necessity, like production numbers where microphones would be visible. There was a time when PARTS of numbers were pre-recorded and the parts of the number where it was feasible, the singing was live. This method preserved the excitement of live TV as much as possible, but soon they discovered that it was much easier on them to pre-record everything and leave nothing to chance.

 

Between "The Dick Van Dyke Show" and "Diagnosis: Murder", Dick made 2 stabs at a sitcom comeback. There may have been 3, they lasted such a little amount of time I don't remember. "The NEW Dick Van Dyke Show" is long forgotten which ran from 71 to 74. I remember a little bit about it. It was certainly watchable but like TLS suffered in comparison to the original. It was successful enough to last 3 seasons, the last of which had the last season of "Here's Lucy" as its lead-in. His other sitcom (which I think was called simply "Van Dyke") was in the mid-80s. I saw a couple of episodes and it was fairly good, but shot on videotape, again a production convenience that I did not think was suitable to sitcoms. I never saw an episode of "Diagnosis" but it was slumming for someone with the talents of Dick Van Dyke, but at least it was steady work for Dick. Wasn't "Murder" a "Matlock" spin-off? Interesting that the hottest sitcom stars of the 60s finally gave up on sitcoms and went the murder mystery route--although there was tongue-in-cheek comedy. I wonder if Lucy would have been successful with this type of show. The more I think about it, I think she would have...with a LITTLE more emphasis on comedy.

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Between "The Dick Van Dyke Show" and "Diagnosis: Murder", Dick made 2 stabs at a sitcom comeback. There may have been 3, they lasted such a little amount of time I don't remember. "The NEW Dick Van Dyke Show" is long forgotten which ran from 71 to 74. I remember a little bit about it. It was certainly watchable but like TLS suffered in comparison to the original. It was successful enough to last 3 seasons, the last of which had the last season of "Here's Lucy" as its lead-in. His other sitcom (which I think was called simply "Van Dyke") was in the mid-80s. I saw a couple of episodes and it was fairly good, but shot on videotape, again a production convenience that I did not think was suitable to sitcoms. I never saw an episode of "Diagnosis" but it was slumming for someone with the talents of Dick Van Dyke, but at least it was steady work for Dick. Wasn't "Murder" a "Matlock" spin-off? Interesting that the hottest sitcom stars of the 60s finally gave up on sitcoms and went the murder mystery route--although there was tongue-in-cheek comedy. I wonder if Lucy would have been successful with this type of show. The more I think about it, I think she would have...with a LITTLE more emphasis on comedy.

 

I wish "The New Dick Van Dyke Show" would reappear somewhere. It has such a great cast - Nancy Dussault and, in the final season, Chita Rivera, especially. It's has always seemed very "edgy" to me, but it's probably no more adult than "Mary Tyler Moore." I always think of Dick as being more family oriented. I've never seen an episode of 1988's "The Van Dyke Show." CBS tried to make a "Dick Van Dyke-Mary Tyler Moore Hour" and scheduled Mary's "Annie McGuire" right after it. "Annie McGuire" was a completely different type of show and Mary said it was a mistake to pair the two together. Both shows were quickly cancelled. I love "Diagnosis: Murder." The Encore Suspense channel (which I didn't know was an actual thing until a few months ago) is airing the show and I've been watching it every night. It really is an excellent showcase for Dick - especially in the middle seasons. "Diagnosis: Murder" was actually a "Jake and the Fatman" spin-off. There was a two-part "Matlock" cross-over, though. There were lots of great people on that show for Dick to interact with.

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Lucy and Dick were funny especially in the second half of the clip. Lucy's facial expressions especially after the machine goes beserk are hilarious and remind me of Lucy Carmichael. She looked great here very stylish for the 1970s and her age. What else was done in this eposide?

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Lucy and Dick were funny especially in the second half of the clip. Lucy's facial expressions especially after the machine goes beserk are hilarious and remind me of Lucy Carmichael. She looked great here very stylish for the 1970s and her age. What else was done in this eposide?

 

Other sketches: Dick plays a TV executive who tries to fire a temperamental star named Marion Lane (not to be confused with Marion Lorne ;)), played by Lucy. In another, Lucy played a golddigger who was now an old lady because her husband (Dick) lived much longer than expected. Lucy tries various ways to finally kill Dick. Dick's son Barry Van Dyke was also in the sketch. There was another pantomime sketch with Lucy and Dick playing tourists who end up destroying a forest. Other moments had Lucy and Dick interacting with regular Andy Kaufman and Lucy and Dick dancing together.

 

It was announced in November of last year that there was a 2012 release date for the DVD set by MPI. I'm hoping we'll get Dick's Let's Talk to Lucy episode(s) as an extra. :D

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Other sketches: Dick plays a TV executive who tries to fire a temperamental star named Marion Lane (not to be confused with Marion Lorne ;)), played by Lucy. In another, Lucy played a golddigger who was now an old lady because her husband (Dick) lived much longer than expected. Lucy tries various ways to finally kill Dick. Dick's son Barry Van Dyke was also in the sketch. There was another pantomime sketch with Lucy and Dick playing tourists who end up destroying a forest. Other moments had Lucy and Dick interacting with regular Andy Kaufman and Lucy and Dick dancing together.

 

It was announced in November of last year that there was a 2012 release date for the DVD set by MPI. I'm hoping we'll get Dick's Let's Talk to Lucy episode(s) as an extra. :D

It's sounds hilarious and I would love to see this on DVD.

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Per TVShowsonDVD... VAN DYKE AND COMPANY (1976), coming on September 25, 2012.

 

Amazon.com listing

TV's Favorite Funny Man Returns With Mary Tyler Moore, Carl Reiner, & Other Comic Greats! Following his legendary success in situation comedy, Emmy-winning icon DICK VAN DYKE headlined his own variety show in 1975-76 on NBC-TV. Now available for the first time since they were originally broadcast, these hilarious hours showcase the many wonderful talents of television (The Dick Van Dyke Show) and film (Mary Poppins) legend DICK VAN DYKE, who can sing, dance and bring laughter to audiences of all ages. This complete series collection of VAN DYKE & COMPANY features series regular Andy Kaufman (Taxi). Bob Einstein (aka Super Dave Osbourne (Curb Your Enthusiasm) and an illustrious list of guest performers such as Lucille Ball, Chevy Chase, Carol Burnett, Flip Wilson, Harvey Korman, Tommy Smothers, Hal Linden, Freddie Prinze, John Byner and Gabe Kaplan, in addition to Dick's old co-stars Mary Tyler Moore and Carl Reiner. Musical guests include Ike & Tina Turner, John Denver, K.C. & The Sunshine Band, Sha Na Na, The Spinners, Bobbie Gentry, The Sylvers, Donna Fargo and Lola Falana. Bonus features: Dick and brother Jerry Van Dyke from the 1967 Dick Van Dyke Monsanto Special and a pair of 1965 Let's Talk To Lucy radio shows where Lucille Ball interviews Dick Van Dyke!

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  • 2 months later...

I wish "The New Dick Van Dyke Show" would reappear somewhere. It has such a great cast - Nancy Dussault and, in the final season, Chita Rivera, especially. It's has always seemed very "edgy" to me, but it's probably no more adult than "Mary Tyler Moore." I always think of Dick as being more family oriented.

 

I was just a kiddie at the time but wasn't there a big scandal for the day about a NDVDS episode in which their daughter walked in on Dick and Hope Lange while they having sex in their bedroom? Of course you don't see that scene but it was evidently referred to throughout the episode. I remember reading about the episode in TV GUIDE and that a lot of stations refused to broadcast it - never saw it myself and we did watch the show regularly so wonder if CBS never aired it or just our local channel was one of the ones that wouldn't air it.

 

The show was not a bad sitcom, kind of a surprise it has completely disappeared.

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I was just a kiddie at the time but wasn't there a big scandal for the day about a NDVDS episode in which their daughter walked in on Dick and Hope Lange while they having sex in their bedroom? Of course you don't see that scene but it was evidently referred to throughout the episode. I remember reading about the episode in TV GUIDE and that a lot of stations refused to broadcast it - never saw it myself and we did watch the show regularly so wonder if CBS never aired it or just our local channel was one of the ones that wouldn't air it.

 

The show was not a bad sitcom, kind of a surprise it has completely disappeared.

Probably only because they didn't quite make the 100 episode mark, if I recall correctly (I believe it only ran 3 seasons), which seems to be the "magic mark" for most sitcoms to be sold into syndication. It probably didn't help that it was constantly compared to his original early 60s sitcom with MTM, et. al., so good as it was it inevitably paled in comparison.

 

Doesn't all the hoohah about that subject matter back then seem rather tame -- and silly! -- now considering we often get to see the act in question?? Well not literally -- at least, not yet on broadcast TV -- but probably sooner than later at this point. :)

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I was just a kiddie at the time but wasn't there a big scandal for the day about a NDVDS episode in which their daughter walked in on Dick and Hope Lange while they having sex in their bedroom? Of course you don't see that scene but it was evidently referred to throughout the episode. I remember reading about the episode in TV GUIDE and that a lot of stations refused to broadcast it - never saw it myself and we did watch the show regularly so wonder if CBS never aired it or just our local channel was one of the ones that wouldn't air it.

 

The show was not a bad sitcom, kind of a surprise it has completely disappeared.

 

CBS refused to air the episode. Dick and Carl Reiner were extremely angry that the network wouldn't air it especially since other shows like All in the Family were doing more controversal things. Dick and Carl opted not to continue the series at the end of the season. There were only three seasons, so it really never got much play in syndication. There's also a big format change in the last season, which probably makes it even less desirable to syndicators. TNT showed it for a time, as did one of those nostalgia channels (Goodlife?). Warner Bros. had some episodes of the show avaliable for online streaming about five years ago. It would be great if they could do that again. The infamous unaired episode was aired in syndication.

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"Van Dyke" won the Emmy as Outstanding Variety series even though it had long been canceled. It barely lasted half a season.

By this time, TV variety were gasping for its last breaths. I don't think it was because there wasn't an audience for variety either. It's just by this time, the method of production sucked any spontaneity out of these shows, with the notable exception of "Carol Burnett". They sacrificed the "live" look for ease of production. They were put together piece-meal and if there was any audience at all, the response was sweetened beyond believability. They didn't think we would notice, but we did--even if it was only subconsciously. They just weren't "fun" anymore. I blame a lot of this on producer George Schlatter and Laugh-In. The focus of these shows shifted from music to comedy. Pre-recording used to be done only as a necessity, like production numbers where microphones would be visible. There was a time when PARTS of numbers were pre-recorded and the parts of the number where it was feasible, the singing was live. This method preserved the excitement of live TV as much as possible, but soon they discovered that it was much easier on them to pre-record everything and leave nothing to chance.

 

Between "The Dick Van Dyke Show" and "Diagnosis: Murder", Dick made 2 stabs at a sitcom comeback. There may have been 3, they lasted such a little amount of time I don't remember. "The NEW Dick Van Dyke Show" is long forgotten which ran from 71 to 74. I remember a little bit about it. It was certainly watchable but like TLS suffered in comparison to the original. It was successful enough to last 3 seasons, the last of which had the last season of "Here's Lucy" as its lead-in. His other sitcom (which I think was called simply "Van Dyke") was in the mid-80s. I saw a couple of episodes and it was fairly good, but shot on videotape, again a production convenience that I did not think was suitable to sitcoms. I never saw an episode of "Diagnosis" but it was slumming for someone with the talents of Dick Van Dyke, but at least it was steady work for Dick. Wasn't "Murder" a "Matlock" spin-off? Interesting that the hottest sitcom stars of the 60s finally gave up on sitcoms and went the murder mystery route--although there was tongue-in-cheek comedy. I wonder if Lucy would have been successful with this type of show. The more I think about it, I think she would have...with a LITTLE more emphasis on comedy.

Absolutely, wish Lucy had gotten that Murder she wrote show instead of that old biddy, LOL! :lucythrill:

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CBS refused to air the episode. Dick and Carl Reiner were extremely angry that the network wouldn't air it especially since other shows like All in the Family were doing more controversal things. Dick and Carl opted not to continue the series at the end of the season. There were only three seasons, so it really never got much play in syndication. There's also a big format change in the last season, which probably makes it even less desirable to syndicators. TNT showed it for a time, as did one of those nostalgia channels (Goodlife?). Warner Bros. had some episodes of the show avaliable for online streaming about five years ago. It would be great if they could do that again. The infamous unaired episode was aired in syndication.

Seems to me, the Paley center could aquire it as a must see.

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Absolutely, wish Lucy had gotten that Murder she wrote show instead of that old biddy, LOL! :lucythrill:

I've read Doris Day was first choice, then Jean Stapleton and they both turned it down. I wonder if Lucy would have? They really should have offered her SOMETHING after all she made CBS tv the Tiffany network!

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I've read Doris Day was first choice, then Jean Stapleton and they both turned it down. I wonder if Lucy would have? They really should have offered her SOMETHING after all she made CBS tv the Tiffany network!

Lucy turning down a job? I dun't thin so. :lucythrill: Boy, you sure know lots about lotsa thins, Harry's got himself a rival here! :lucythrill:

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